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11th Annual Recombinant Protein Therapeutics: Fusion Proteins and Beyond, January 19-20, 2015, San Diego, CA

11th Annual Recombinant Protein Therapeutics: Fusion Proteins and Beyond, January 19-20, 2015, San Diego, CA

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Conference AGENDA

http://www.chi-peptalk.com/recombinant-protein-therapeutics

Cambridge Healthtech Institute’s PepTalk presents its 11th Annual Recombinant Protein Therapeutics: Fusion Proteins and Beyond, January 19-20, 2015, San Diego, CA… 900 more words

Proteomics

Cytolinguistics— Exact Communication Mechanism in Genomics

Cytolinguistics— Exact Communication Mechanism in Genomics

Author: Bill Zheng, MD, PhD

Genomics studies have uncovered many sequences related hereditary diseases, however, there are fewer studies delves into the investigation on how the genomics language are being stored, processed, programmed, formulated and being operated systematically. 717 more words

Genome Biology

Six Johns Hopkins Alzheimer's Experts Discuss The Latest Discoveries

Six Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Experts Discuss The Latest Discoveries

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

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Special Offer from Johns Hopkins Health Alerts

Six Alzheimer’s Experts Discuss The Latest Discoveries… 1,287 more words

Innovations In Neurophysiology & Neuropsychology

The Arnold Relman Challenge: US HealthCare Costs vs US HealthCare Outcomes

The Arnold Relman Challenge: US HealthCare Costs vs US HealthCare Outcomes

Reviewer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN… 3,166 more words

Health Economics And Outcomes Research

Is Amazon a “Monopoly” (Or Is The Publishing Industry Too Loose With Its Words)?

In the ubiquitous, and increasingly annoying, coverage of the Amazon–Hachette dispute, it’s common for those who side with Hachette to assert that Amazon is a “monopoly” without really understanding what that word means.* One example is Steve Wasserman’s… 539 more words

Law

sandvick reblogged this on DailyHistory.org and commented:

Today, the Chronicle of Higher Education has an article by Jennifer Howard about how university presses are forced to tread carefully with Amazon. While Amazon boosts sales, it is also extremely difficult for small university presses to negotiate “over e-pricing and other issues.” As the largest seller of books, it is not surprising that Amazon accounts for approximately a third of most university press sales. Additionally, Amazon makes it easy for scholars to get books especially difficult to quickly get even from university libraries. More than one scholar has ordered a book from Amazon instead of waiting for an interlibrary loan. Still, university presses are intimidated and somewhat overwhelmed when they negotiate contracts with the massive online retailer. Presses are expected to agree to discounts, pay money to Amazon to get their books promoted, and accede to e-book prices that work for Amazon. University presses have little choice deal with Amazon very carefully. Unlike Hachette Book Group, university presses are incapable of challenging Amazon the same way. [caption id="attachment_1745" align="alignnone" width="259"]Will this destroy book publishers? Will this destroy book publishers?[/caption] This dovetails nicely with this post at that the Misfortune of Knowing that asks whether Amazon is a monopoly. Hachette Book Group is currently negotiating with Amazon over discounts demanded by the retailer to sell their e-books. Publishers have thrown around terms like monopoly and monopsony when describing Amazon. A.M.B. argues that in the Hachette case, Amazon appears to be neither a monopoly or a monopsony (a buyer that is powerful enough “force suppliers to start discounting against another.”) In many ways, university presses face the same pressures as Hachette, but they have fewer options. Ultimately, Hachette will probably be forced to agree to Amazon’s demands because there are fewer and fewer alternatives to Amazon everyday. [caption id="attachment_1853" align="alignnone" width="300"]Remember what these little guys did to the record business? Remember what these little guys did to the record business?[/caption] One of the most interesting aspects of the growing rift between publishers and Amazon is it highlights how publishers essentially ceded control of the publishing business to Amazon and Apple. Publishers no longer control the technology of books because they never created a Kindle or successful e-reader of their own. It was the booksellers (Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Apple) that created e-readers instead publishers. Instead of selling hardware (books), publishers are now in the software business (e-books). When they lost control of the hardware that books are read, they lost the ability to control their own fates. In many ways, the publishers dilemma is identical to the predicament faced by the music business. Unfortunately, publishers are probably facing a similar future to the record companies unless they take control of their businesses.

How Important Are University Press Books to the Library? One Case Study

Last month I posted a piece here in the Kitchen titled “How Important Are Library Sales to the University Press? One Case Study.” That posting reported on a study that I did in collaboration with Dean Blobaum of the University of Chicago Press (UCP): using sales data from UCP’s 2012 imprints and library holdings data as recorded in WorldCat, we tried to get a sense of what proportion of those sales were represented by library purchases. 1,464 more words

World Of Tomorrow

sandvick reblogged this on DailyHistory.org and commented:

Last month, Rick Anderson at the scholarly kitchen asked what percentage of university presses book sales were to libraries. This month he has turned the question around and asked what percentage of books circulated by libraries were published by university presses. Anderson has some interesting findings about the importance of university press books to libraries.