Tags » American Cinema

Twelfth Night (1910)

This Shakespeare play remains a popular film subject, with its themes of gender confusion and romantic frustration, blended into a safe, comedic resolution. This was its first known film rendering, and it suggests that by 1910 we are moving into a different context for silent film adaptations of classical works. 175 more words

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The Rounders (1914)

Today is Charlie Chaplin’s 125th birthday, so I thought I’d take a break from the Edison shorts I’ve been reviewing and talk about another of his classic comedy reels from 1914. 258 more words

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Cripple Creek Bar Room Scene (1899)

This is another one of those movies sometimes called “the first Western,” and I guess it has a reasonable claim, although it’s so short that it’s a little hard to think of it as really definable in terms of genre. 190 more words

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Shooting Captured Insurgents (1898)

In April of 1898, the United Stated went to war with Spain, and the face of American cinema changed forever. Suddenly, instead of showing amusing snippets of daily life or panoramas of interesting locations, the movies were showing “news,” depicting important events “as they happened,” and showing American troops in the most positive light. 181 more words

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A Midsummer Night's Dream (1909)

This is the first American attempt to interpret Shakespeare that I know about. Unlike the ambitious British efforts I’ve reviewed before, they took Shakespeare’s lightest, most accessible comedy, and gave it a child-friendly treatment. 213 more words

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What Demoralized the Barber Shop (1897)

This little clip from the days of film’s “innocent” youth gives us a chance to look at the development of what would become known as the “ 200 more words

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Black Diamond Express (1896)

This movie gives me an opportunity to talk about remakes, because it is a double remake. It is an American remake of the French film “ 217 more words

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