Tags » Bicultural

A Bilingual Child: The Big Bad Wolf

We have a new obsession in our house at the moment: Wolves.  More precisely, The Big Bad Wolf.   Or at other times it’s the Lobo Malvado. 562 more words

Bilingual Child

Illicit desires

Crime fiction is not my favourite genre. Just ask my friend Gas Wylde, whose novel based on the Wanda Beach murders I have been struggling to finish – just because I’m afraid it will get too grisly. 938 more words

Bicultural

maamej reblogged this on Border Crossings and commented:

Very belatedly, I have found out about the Africa Reading Challenge 2014. It expires at the end of December. Fortunately, the challenge is quite modest. You only have to read 5 books, with a minimum of 3 by African authors, from at least 2 regions of Africa. Kinna, who’s hosting the challenge, makes a number of suggestions for participating, which include reading in more than one language (it would have to be in translation, for me), both male and female authors, and mix of fiction and non-fiction. In a word: diversity. Or, alternatively, you can explore in depth a particular tradition, theme, or language group. The biggest challenge for me will be finding the time to read 5 books between now and the end of the year. Reviewing them all is apparently not necessary (although ideally I would like to). The main point is making the commitment to read and expand your knowledge and understanding of both African literature, and the history, culture, politics, economics, etc. of the continent. On my list for the challenge are Nnedi Okorafor’s fantasy 'Who Fears Death', and 'Cola’s journey' – Cola Bilkuei’s account of his experience as a child soldier and refugee, if I can find where I packed it when I moved house! I’m not promising I’ll make it to 5 books in not much more than 6 weeks, but I’ll see how I go. And I’ll start out by cheating shamelessly making it a bit easier on myself by reblogging the review I wrote in 2012, of a novel by Malla Nunn.

What is the British upbringing style ?

What is your experience of a British upbringing?” is one of my final questions. All the interviewee-couples told me stories about themselves, their bilingual and bicultural day-to-day challenges but at the end I asked them to talk about their experience in the country they live in; things they like or dislike about the way the parents interact with kids and talk to them; the British style of education. 637 more words

Frogette

Raul + Dorothea's Wedding Trailer

On October 18th, Raul and Dorothea made their dream come true.

Their wedding ceremony and reception took place at the Lithuanian Music Hall at 5 PM. 10 more words

Philadelphia

TBT: "Straddling Like a Cubano": The Construction of Co-citizenship, Origin Stories, and Discourses in a Bilingual, Bicultural, Biliterate Individual's Own Words - UMass Boston, Fall 2011

Introduction

In Apling 635, we’ve reviewed educational philosophy and methodological practices which refer to the learner as a participant in the process who needs reinforcement, support, and the means of self-empowerment needed to help him/her build social agency.  4,171 more words

What’s your name?

The bilingual (or multilingual) story starts with this question, in a certain way. For parents the choice of their child’s name is full of meaning and often related to a story, a shared moment. 629 more words

Family