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Bookish Thoughts | Authors I Haven't Read (Yet!)

You know there’s some authors you just haven’t got around to reading yet, maybe their body of work is so vast you don’t know where to start, maybe they write in a style that you’re not sure will appeal to you, maybe the size of the book put you off. 143 more words

Adult

International Women's Month - Inspiring Change - Lucretia Mott, 10 of 10

A few last quotes from Lucretia Coffin Mott (1793-1880):

“Any great change must expect opposition, because it shakes the very foundation of privilege.”

“’Truth for authority’, rather than ‘Authority for truth’”. 97 more words

Emma Field Book Three

International Women's Month - Lucretia Mott - 9 of 10

One cold, rainy day when Lucretia Mott, who was in her seventies, was riding home from Philadelphia in a horse-drawn car she witnessed a conductor “ordering an elderly black woman to ride outside in the rain. 186 more words

Emma Field Book Three

International Women's Month - Lucretia Mott, 8 of 10

In February of 1840 Lucretia Mott’s travels took her to Delaware where she stayed with relatives. As she travelled about the countryside with Daniel Neall, the president of Pennsylvania Hall, their carriage was stoned. 197 more words

Emma Field Book Three

International Women's Month - Inspiring Change - Lucretia Mott, 7 of 10

In the summer of 1848 Lucretia and James Mott travelled to northern New York State to visit the Seneca on the Cattaraugus reservation.  As members of the “Indian Committee” for the Quakers of their region they were especially concerned about the plight of the Seneca. 179 more words

Emma Field Book Three

International Women's Month - Inspiring Change - Lucretia Mott 6 of 10

Lucretia and James Mott were named delegates from Pennsylvania to the World’s Anti-Slavery Convention in London, England in June of 1840 and the world of the abolitionists was thrown into upheaval. 117 more words

Emma Field Book Three

International Women's Month - Lucretia Mott, 5 of 10

Great Britain abolished slavery in the West Indies in August of 1833, prompting those opposed to slavery in the United States to come together. James Mott was a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society and Lucretia, attended as a delegate of the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society. 379 more words

Emma Field Book Three