Tags » Call And Response

Interview with GG winner Arleen Paré

I was delighted to be introduced to Arleen Paré this fall when we read together at Russelll Books in Victoria; we had been writing together for some time in what we call the Electronic Garrett, which is in its own way a call and response, only this time between some of Canada’s finest poets (and me), plus I had asked to interview her for Brick Books.  1,096 more words

Brick Books

(Psalm 31:5)

Into Your hand I commit my spirit;

You have ransomed me, O LORD, God of truth.

Psalm 31:5

This verse caught my eye, in part, because Jesus quotes the first part of it from the cross. 905 more words

Bible

"Eyes on who?" "Is that the best you can do?": Busting My Pavlovian Moves in the Primary Classroom

“Eyes on who?” Oh, God help me, is this the best I can do?!

This opening line is the bread and butter of primary classroom management, especially in the US. 372 more words

Classroom Management

Call And Response Distribution: New arrivals from Half Sports and You Got A Radio

There are some new arrivals in the Call And Response online store now. As with the first batch of CDs I got in stock, they are all loosely in a postpunk/new wave sort of zone, but each offers something a bit different and again, all of them are bands I personally rate and am happy to recommend. 207 more words

Call And Response

Photography and Democracy

An interview from about two years ago, for the project Photography and Democracy, and courtesy Eva-Lotta Jannsen. Photography and Democracy has many other such interviews with South African photographers and is an important site to visit to learn and find out more about the views of South African photographers, especially regarding the concept and their views around democracy.

http://photographyanddemocracy.com/?portfolio=cedric-nunn-2

Photography

Retro Music Monday - African American Music - part 2 - Work Songs

From Wikipedia

African American work songs originally developed in the era of captivity, between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. Because they were part of an almost entirely oral culture they had no fixed form and only began to be recorded as the era of slavery came to an end after 1865. 705 more words

Retro Music Monday

Shouting for Equivalence

Shouting for Equivalence

by Bridget Adam

The following reactions are no longer a surprise to me as I begin the year with my new 6th grade math students: 486 more words

Mathematics