Tags » Charles Hodge

Princeton Theology & Scottish Philosophy

 

The bigass picture of Charles Hodge should alert the reader that “Princeton Theology” isn’t referring to the current Princeton. The current Princeton Semimary has a much greater on Barthian thought, among other things (it’d be unfairly reductive to say that Princeton Seminary is all Barthian, but it’s difficult to avoid this impression due to the two huge stars in the seminary: McCormack & Hunsinger). 1,187 more words

In His Light We See Light

“So long as men judge themselves by themselves, and compare themselves among themselves, they will be in the dark as to their true character. It is not until they judge themselves by the perfect standard of duty contained in the law of God, that they can have any proper knowledge of their real character. 19 more words

Sin

Knowledge of Sin Derived from the Law

“This knowledge of sin, which enters so essentially into the nature of true conviction, is derived from the law; ‘for by the law is the knowledge of sin.’ …The law is the means of communicating this knowledge, because it is an expression of the perfect holiness of God.” –Charles Hodge “The Way of Life” (Banner of Truth) p. 80-81

Sin

Arrested By An Influence

“Men who have long lived in unbelief or carelessness are arrested by an influence which they can neither understand nor resist. There is no new revelation, no novel arguments, no conscious process of reasoning. 26 more words

God's Power

The Eyes Must Be Opened

“The eyes must be opened to see sin as it is represented in the word of God, as an exceedingly evil and bitter thing, as extending not merely to overt acts or outbreaks of passion, but as deepy seated in the heart, polluting at the fountain the streams of life; as really deserving the punishment which God has denounced against it; and as having such hold upon the inward principles of our nature, that its power cannot be broken by any ordinary exertion.” –Charles Hodge “The Way of Life” (Banner of Truth) p. 78-79

Sin

Faith and Evidence

“We are not required to believe in the providence of God without evidence; but our being unable to reconcile his government with our liberty, is no rational ground of unbelief…We are required to believe nothing on these, or any other subjects, without adequate proof; but we are not allowed to make our ignorance of the relations of these truths an excuse for either unbelief or disobedience. 61 more words

Faith

Comprehending by Faith

“If, then, there are in our own nature so many things which we cannot comprehend, how can we expect to understand God—to know the reasons and relations of his acts, or to be able to reconcile in all cases his works with his attributes? 87 more words

Faith