Tags » Child Psychologist

Tuesdays, at Four Thirty p.m.

Some children’s books will always seem as if they were written for adults, and “Tuesdays, at Four Thirty p.m.” is among those books. And since children’s books are far from anything an adult will read, they’re always a surprise. 641 more words

Books In Hebrew

Meet Dr. Alexis Resnick! She shares her views on ADD/ADHD and her thoughts about the new children's book, "Where Has Polly Gone?"

We had the pleasure of meeting child psychologist Dr. Alexis Resnick, and we would like to introduce her to you! Due to Dr. Resnick’s great passion for children and focus on ADD/ADHD, she sparked our attention and we knew her thoughts would intrigue our audience. 635 more words

Where Has Polly Gone

How Toddler's Thrive by Tovah Klein: Book Review

Shortly after arriving at the table, my family begins to eat. Within minutes, my 2 year old begins to squirm and attempts to get down. He slides the plates away, almost spilling drinks and knocking over bowls and other table settings. 524 more words

Kids

Introverted and Extroverted Children

Parentune Child Psychologist Dr. Ann Simi John explains the personalities of introverted and extroverted children.

Parenting

The Successful Education Toolkit: What do Children Need to Flourish at School?

We want our children to have a great education, so what is the secret? We tend to look hard at what is on offer: the quality of the curriculum, how well organised is the school, are the teachers inspiring and committed. 874 more words

Helping Children Flourish

principalaim reblogged this on principalaim and commented:

What is the foundation of a successful educational experience for school age children? I believe the basis for a successful educational experience is happy and healthy children. When leaving principalaim, I hope you know that for me student health and success go hand in hand. I truly believe that a happy, emotionally healthy child can do anything in school and in life. Jeni Hooper (Child Psychologist) also believes children do best when they are happy and have a good sense of self. Specifically, Hooper says “what children need to be happy has little to do with the curriculum or the school and more to do with those little nuisances that determine how positive the learning experience is for children.” Schools should be looking at models that put the emotional health and well-being of its students above everything else. I can only hope that one day all of our schools adopt a mission that puts children’s well-being first. tlb