Tags » Colloquialisms

Aussie-isms and Novel Writing: It Gets Tricky!

When my Canadian husband first came to Australia, he had to learn the language. It sounds odd, doesn’t it? Canada and Australia are both English-speaking, Commonwealth countries. 625 more words

Writer

Pesky American English -isms! You can learn something New Every day - and not always so entertainingly!

Entertaining as well as enlightening. Refreshingly natural and humourous (or should it be ‘humorous’ or even ‘humoros’?) presentation style too, which could well be used in any presentations we may have to do ourselves from time to time. 18 more words

WoW!

Rubber

rubber: To eavesdrop on conversations on the rural “party line” telephone system. Prior to the early 1990s, rural telephone lines were connected via party lines. Each telephone had its own particular ring, however there was nothing stopping an interested neighbour from picking up the phone to listen in on someone else’s conversation. 63 more words

Colloquialisms

Does Playful Prose Hide Trauma in Yellow Paper?

Considering that the narrative of “Novel on Yellow Paper” “resides in the play of discourse,” it is easy for the reader to lose track of what is occurring throughout the novel (Nemesvari, 32). 491 more words

Gandy Dancers

Gandy dancers: The name given to the “trackmen” on the railway.

Saskatchewan

Swish

swish: The liquor leached from oak barrels procured from distilleries (usually whiskey). The barrels were purchased ostensibly for making flower pots, but first, the custom was to fill ‘em up with distilled water and let the alcohol leach out. 69 more words

Colloquialisms

From 8-25-14

I was carrying a loaf of bread when an older female saw me and said happily, “Oh, good! You can use that to make your boyfriend a sandwich!” 24 more words