Tags » Corporeality

Hemi GSI Convergence 2014 (October 2-5, NYC) | Call for Participation | Convocatoria para participación | Chamada para participantes


Hemi GSI Convergence 2014 (October 2-5, NYC) | Call for Participation | Convocatoria para participación | Chamada para participantes

Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics… 15,800 more words

Ben Woodard on Pessimism and Pragmatism

Ben Woodard at the leading edge of the post-nihilst turn:

“[P]essimism can provide a certain form of useful clarity (not unlike Justine’s comportment in von Trier’s Melancholia). 290 more words

Corporeality

Unknowing and the Anosognosia of Everyday Life

Excepts From Interviews with David Dunning and V.S. Ramachandran

Many have argued that human rationality grants us special access to the depths of psychological and metaphysical realities. 3,146 more words

Corporeality

Designing the Apocalypse: On the Limits of Cartography

I was thinking of forwarding a comment to Adam Robbert’s post at knowledge-ecology.com (Earth’s Aesthetics: Knowledge and Media Ecologies) about his concept of mapping ecology when for some reasons my mind wandered off into Guattari. 1,503 more words

Michael- reblogged this on synthetic_zero and commented:

Accommodating and repurposing the apocalypse? I'm not sure what a "post-critical, post-cartographic engagement" might look like in this context but I certainly support the move towards performative praxis and making the attempt to adapt to the coming changes. Of course the question will be 'who will do the designing, and in who's best interest will it be designed?'

Approaches to the Anthropocene, Latour and Philippe Descola

Michael- reblogged this on synthetic_zero and commented:

Two major thinkers thinking and talking major issues. Hell yeah. Dr. Philippe Descola was a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Peter Wall Institute and Dr. Bruno Latour was the fall 2013 Wall Exchange lecturer, and on September 25, 2013 engaged in a discussion at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver about the concept of the "Anthropocene". ABSTRACT: Dr. Descola and Dr. Latour are two of France's most prominent intellectuals, redefining their respective fields of expertise by considering the place of human agency - and non-human actors - in the construction of the modern world. In this conversation, Dr. Latour and Dr. Descola debated the idea of the anthropocene, a new geological era in which humans have become the principal agents for the transformation of our planetary systems, from small-scale consumption of natural resources to to large-scale, human-induced climate changes. Drawing on the fields of anthropology, science studies, and other allied disciplines, these two thinkers discussed their views on how intervention in the natural world has not only transformed planetary ecosystems, but also the very ideas and models we use to think about the planet as a whole. This event was co-sponsored by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, the Museum of Anthropology and the Consulat général de France à Vancouver.