Tags » Dialects

Kent accent in the 19th century: TRAP

This post continues from the introductory Kent accent in the 19th century.

The TRAP vowel

Figure 3. The timbre of the [æ]-like TRAP vowel by the seven informants: this timbre is close to the DRESS vowel (Yes), or it is not near the the DRESS vowel, but shifted towards [a] (No). 528 more words
Articulation

Kent accent in the 19th century: Rhoticity

This post continues from the introductory Kent accent in the 19th century.

Rhoticity

Rhoticity refers to the pronunciation of /r/. Originally, all instances of /r/ were pronounced in all dialects of English. 653 more words

Articulation

A Guide to Berlinerisch

Ian Farrell explores the origins and development of Berlinerisch – and shows us how to speak ‘like a local’…

This is an excerpt from an article originally published on… 2,664 more words

Sherif N' the Bedouins

Five years ago in a Qatari public school, I was walking into my first class of middle school. New building, new teachers, new system, but the same students I was raised with. 618 more words

Language

The book I read to research this post was Mother Tongue by Bill Bryson which is a very witty look at the development of languages with English being predominant. 306 more words

History

We Learn Something New Everyday

We all know the saying.. Yeah yeah. Well I haven’t learned anything today. So I figured I could share some knowledge with you. (You’re welcome) This was my all time favorite essay from my sophomore year at UA. 1,590 more words

The English language: a hodgepodge from the start

Set among the call centers and storage facilities of Jarrow in the northeast of England is a farm, of sorts.

There are pigs, sheep and goats here. 628 more words