Tags » Digital History

Backlash against the digital humanities movement

Our new colleague at Hertfordshire, Adam Crymble, has recently written an ‘essay on the backlash against the digital humanities movement’ – a reflection on ‘living in the age of digital hubris’ over the past decade.  289 more words

History

Do E-Readers Threaten Learning in the Humanities? - In One Word - NO

Naomi S. Baron in a post at the Chronicle of Higher Education argues that e-reading is the single greatest threat to the humanities.  Well, maybe not the biggest threat, but enough of a menace for Baron to publish a soon to be released book from Oxford University Press extolling the dangers posed by e-readers entitled  582 more words

Daily History

Why most MOOCs are boring for nearly everybody involved.

“White-collar professionals, too, are subject to routinization and degradation, proceeding by the same logic that hit manual fabrication a hundred years ago: the cognitive elements of the job are appropriated from professionals, instantiated in a system or process, and then handed back to a new class of workers–clerks–who replace the professionals.”

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Technology

sandvick reblogged this on DailyHistory.org and commented:

Jonathon Rees at More or Less Bunk has an article on why most MOOCs are boring. MOOCs are Massive Open Online Courses and they are currently all the rage. All around the country, universities are adding MOOCs and incorporating MOOCs in traditional classroom settings. Despite the strong push to create MOOCs, there is not a lot of evidence suggesting that they are particularly effective. Rees points out that MOOCs typically retain only about 10% of their students.  Additionally, when students have MOOC elements added to their traditional classes they are also generally less satisfied. Rees argues that MOOCs are probably only useful for people who are already interested in the course material. The key problem with MOOCs is that students watch them on their computers or mobile devices which are tools of mass distraction. Right now, I have two monitors and four separate programs open on my computer. If I found a MOOC boring, I would probably check my email, surf the web, update my Facebook status, turn on a game or make a sandwich. I am still not sold on the idea that MOOCs are particularly effective.

Anzac and the Ngram

I’ve been struggling to find a suitable topic for a second blog post, but a recent Twitter exchange with @JennyMacleod and @DavidUnderdown9 gave me the idea to write something up about Google Books’ Ngram Viewer. 807 more words

Research

Remembering Lincoln Progress Report: User Experience Front and Center

Our Remembering Lincoln digital project has now reached an important milestone: the Product Definition Document. The process of creating this document proved invaluable in teaching us about our audiences and their needs for what will become our… 965 more words

Lincoln

Digital History in the Surveillance State

Three days ago, the Washington Post reported the results of an investigation into a large collection of files provided by Edward Snowden. Reviewing 160,000 intercepted electronic conversations and 8,000 other documents, which Snowden apparently accessed on NSA servers after that agency collected them, the  1,179 more words

Opinion

sandvick reblogged this on DailyHistory.org and commented:

Typically, the Junto is focused on issues relating to early American history, but Jonathan Wilson has a new post that asks whether historians should be wary of using the same type of information now commonly collected by the NSA. He asks what is "the boundary between private and public (or between private and really really private.)" While historians typically rely on public sources to tell our stories, many historians have also relied on private journals that may reveal the "really, really private" information that the NSA now turns up on a daily basis. It is interesting question. I would imagine that most historians do believe in a right to privacy in our everyday lives, but how far does that right extend into the lives of private people after they are dead (the typical subject of most historians).