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James Joyce's "The Dead"

James Joyce’s “The Dead” tactfully explores the emotional detachment of its main protagonist, Gabriel, during a Christmas dinner party in Dublin. Through multiple social encounters and an intimate scene with his wife Joyce writes the story of a character that constantly struggles to create a valid human connection. 2,191 more words

Writing

LED Day - 121

What is Project LED? Find out here

I’m something of a photographer too! Check out my work here.

Day of September 3rd 2014

Project LED

What is a character?

Or perhaps I should say ‘who is a character?’ These are just some straying thoughts I had whilst reading James Joyce’s Dubliners. Whilst they are far from conclusive I feel as though they have some worth and could perhaps be developed by a mind better regulated than my own. 252 more words

Blog

Bloggiversary and anniversary

Two anniversaries today. In ascending order of importance—my blog has turned two years old. I started it in August 2012 before I launched into the book publishing lark. 298 more words

Poetry

“chemists rarely move.” This One May Leave Forever...

Sweny’s Chemist: probably one the coolest places to visit while retracing Bloom’s footsteps in and around Dublin’s city center. Carine and I went to see Sweny’s right after the “Lestrygonians” walking tour and it was a pleasure to see the site and meet the man behind the counter, Mr. 405 more words

On Reading James Joyce

I should have titled this post “On Reading Early James Joyce” because it only concerns Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man… 778 more words

Books

"James Joyce" -- James Huneker

“James Joyce,” a chapter from James Huneker’s collection of criticism, Unicorns (1917).

Who is James Joyce? is a question that was answered by John Quinn, who told us that the new writer was from Dublin and at present residing in Switzerland; that he is not in good health—his eyes trouble him—and that he was once a student in theology, but soon gave up the idea of becoming a priest. 1,789 more words

Literature