Tags » Fairness

WordPress - You don't decide who is Popular

How does a person create a popular blog? The normal response one will receive is that you “don’t create a popular blog,” instead popularity finds you through blogging habits, techniques, writing ability, and content. 632 more words

Blog

Belladonna Took reblogged this on American Soustannie and commented:

I don’t especially like Opinionated Man’s blog. I followed him way back because he was one of the first bloggers to follow American Soustannie, and he had a number of posts that I, as a baby blogger, found helpful. But after a while I unfollowed him, for several reasons. Firstly, I wanted to take my time about figuring out how this whole blogging thing works (and I was more interested in creating something I liked, that expressed who I was, than in generating huge numbers of followers, which is a big part of what he’s about. If you want to be a power blogger, he will tell you how!) Also, he posted too often for my taste, and some of his posts annoyed me. (Like he says, he’s opinionated!) But even though I’m not a fan, I’m grateful to Jason for what he does, and I see him as an important member of the WordPress community. Like when I, as a really new blogger, used his platform to introduce myself to the world. Some visitors stopped by as a result of that. I’m not sure whether any of them actually followed me, but that’s not the point. The point is, Jason the Opinionated Man gave me a chance to be seen – and if I’d wanted to continue hanging out with his crowd there would have been many more opportunities to promote this blog – because that’s one of the things he does. He has intentionally set up his blog to provide a communal platform that pretty much anyone, as far as I know, can use. [caption id="attachment_957" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Opinionated Man has created a platform for a network that sustains the WordPress community. Even though I don't necessarily want to be locked into it all the time, I like knowing it's there. Opinionated Man has created a platform for a network that sustains the WordPress community. Even though I don't necessarily want to be locked into it all the time, I like knowing it's there.[/caption] So okay, I followed for a bit, then I unfollowed. Every now and then I’d see a reference to his blog somewhere and I’d pop in, check him out, usually learn something new, and then move on. The free market in action. It WORKS, guys, really it does! Does he read every blog he follows? Probably not. Certainly he’s never commented on mine, although he liked one or two posts back in the day when the encouragement meant a lot to me, before I got a little bit established. Do I want to blog the way he does? Nope; my priorities are different. But so what? I figure it’s not my job to judge how he manages his blog or how he uses his blogging time. What I see is a guy with an unusually community-oriented approach to the blogiverse; I see someone who appears to answer every comment anyone leaves on his blog (and there are many), and who actively tries to help other bloggers both by providing a platform and by answering requests for advice. And now I see WordPress making his life difficult and, in the process, taking something away from the overall WordPress blogger community. Recently I became aware of some kind of turmoil surrounding Jason’s blog. I still don’t know all the ins and outs of it, but it seems the powers that be within WordPress decided they didn’t like his Power Blogger approach and restricted some of his activity. So his supporters created a bit of an uproar, and I’m sure I’m not the only person who didn’t like what WP was doing and re-followed him in order to keep track of events, and WP reinstated whatever it was they had taken away. So far so good. Well, apparently now WP is at it again. And once again I don’t know the details, and I don’t expect them to affect a little fish like me … but I have to take issue on the basis of principle. To be quite clear, I think WP has the right to set whatever rules they like, and shape this platform any way they like. They own it. I can’t walk into a store and tell them how to run their business. But in the same spirit, I don’t shop at Wal-Mart, because I think they’re jerks. I hate the way they treat their staff and their suppliers, the fact that a huge amount of the stuff they sell comes direct from the sweatshop to you appalls me, and their chilling effect on the economies of small communities scares me. So I won’t go there and I preach against them at any opportunity. Equally, I choose to shop at Yokes as often as I can, even though I can’t afford to do all my shopping there, because I like the fact that they’re employee-owned and that they support small local farmers and they have a good range of organic products. That's because I believe in putting my money where my values are. I think the same kind of choice may be arising here. I’m probably not going to up and leave immediately if Opinionated Man does, because it’s a hassle and I’m just starting to feel comfortable in this blogging thing … but the fact that WP is restricting the way in which a respected colleague runs his blog will definitely impinge on my comfort level. It’s likely that I’ll start looking around, familiarizing myself with the alternative options. And I’ll be watching to see if there is a pattern of behavior emerging here that I don’t want to live with. [caption id="attachment_958" align="aligncenter" width="529"]How do you make your choices? How do you make your choices?[/caption] I was just going to “like” Jason’s post and hope that a few of my followers would read it … but then it occurred to me that this made an interesting follow-on to my last post. This whole situation, and how I feel about it, and how it influences my future choices vis-a-vis blogging – in a small way, it’s about my personal values. And the thing is, I believe in freedom – including the freedom to post things that people find obnoxious, and the freedom to follow or not follow, like or not like. What do you think? When you choose a provider of a service or a product, do you care about whether their values match yours? And if so, does it bother you that WordPress might be bullying one of its most influential and effective bloggers?

The Same But Different - Comparing America and Australia

One of the fascinating things about living in another country is getting your head around the social and cultural differences at play. Those ‘at play’ differences are everywhere and if you’re mindful, you can find and explore what’s both different and familiar at the same time. 946 more words

Why the Gospel Is Not Fair

Preparing to Teach The Gospel Project for Kids
“Parable of the Vineyard Workers”
Matthew 20:1-16
February 1, 2015

I don’t do well with traffic. I’m getting better (you have to when you work in Nashville), but it is still a struggle. 1,147 more words

The Gospel Project

Singaporeans, Don't you think Blue Collar Workers deserve better?

You know it. Singaporeans have this bigotry and arrogance towards what type of jobs you hold. While we were young, our kindergarten teachers would ask us, one-by-one, what sort of job we dream of becoming. 1,080 more words

Organic News

Equilibrium: The Very Notion

In any conflict when both participants are confident that they’ve played their best hand given the actions of their opponent we know that they are unlikely to change their strategy. 1,851 more words

Philosophy

Not the Full Story

Our Sunday readings had a small fragment of the story of Jonah, and I do love the story of Jonah. Let’s not insult anyone’s intelligence here; this is not a fairy story of some biblical character that gets gobbled up by a whale and somehow survives. 406 more words

Social Justice

Fairness - Kindness

Be fair be kind be loving

one to another

you’ll be like no other …

FAIRNESS