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Scandalous Women: Book Review: Two New Books on Hollywood Scandals

Title: Tinseltown: Murder, Morphine, and Madness at the Dawn of Hollywood

Author: William J. Mann

Hardcover: 480 pages

Publisher: Harper (October 14, 2014)

Language: English… 313 more words

Reblogs

Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle, Buster Keaton in: The Garage

And now, let me close out what’s become an Arbuckle-and-Keaton month of videos with The Garage, the last of their collaborations. This one, from 1920, is set in a small-town gas station-slash-fire station, which I guess will happen in your smaller towns, especially on-screen. 79 more words

Humor

Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle, Buster Keaton in: The Butcher Boy

It’s a common refrain about silent movies that they’re often fascinating just because they’re accidental documentaries. 1917’s The Butcher Boy, here, is one of them because it showcases a model of store that’s basically extinct in the United States: the general store in which all the merchandise is kept safely tucked away from the customers’ hands, thank you, and for that matter the person who gets what you want off the shelves isn’t necessarily the same person who wraps up your packages, and may well have nothing to do with the person who takes your money and counts your change (if you didn’t just put it on your account). 253 more words

Humor

Roscoe Arbuckle, Buster Keaton, Al St John in: The Bell Boy

Well, why not carry on the Arbuckle-Keaton-St John theme, then? For today here’s their 1918 half-hour film The Bell Boy, featuring “Fatty” Arbuckle and Buster Keaton as bellboys (and Al St John as the desk clerk), puttering around in gags set at a small-town hotel and then, as I believe every silent-era movie set in a hotel does, getting to foiling a robbery. 63 more words

Humor

Susan Reads: Room 1219

One of the fun things about reading non-fiction is you learn things about subjects you never knew anything about. Such is what happened when I picked up… 499 more words

Adult

Roscoe Arbuckle and Buster Keaton in: Coney Island

So, Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle. The quickest refutation of the saying there’s no such thing as bad publicity. Remembered as he is as some silent-movie-era guy who was in a scandal, it’s easy to forget he was prominent enough to produce a scandal because he was a really skilled physical comedian, someone who could just… 513 more words

Humor