Tags » FMRI

oh BOLD where art thou? Evidence for a "mm-scale" match between intracortical and fMRI measures.

A frequently discussed problem with functional magnetic resonance imaging is that we don’t really understand how the hemodynamic ‘activations’ measured by the technique relate to actual neuronal phenomenon. 782 more words

Cognitive Neuroscience

Weekly Neuroscience Update

Researchers have shed new light on how cells called gliomas migrate in the brain and cause devastating tumors. The findings, published in Nature Communications, show that gliomas — malignant glial cells — disrupt normal neural connections and hijack control of blood vessels. 323 more words

Weekly Round-Up

Deconstructing misleading media coverage of neuroscience of couples therapy

Do we owe psychotherapists something more than noble lies and fairy tales in our translations of fMRI results?

The press release below was placed on the web by the University of Ottawa and refers to an… 1,536 more words

Remembering the past and imagining the future: New paper from the lab


Figure caption: A comparison of fMRI activation for remembering the past (warm colors) vs. imagining the future (cool colors).

The lab has a new paper out: “Remembering and imagining differentially engage the hippocampus: A multivariate fMRI investigation”. 250 more words

Research

Tools for Debunking Neuro-Nonsense About Psychotherapy

The second in my two-part blog post at PLOS Mind the Brain involves assisting readers to do some debunking of bad neuoscience for themselves. The particular specimen is neurononsense intended to promote emotionally focused psychotherapy (EFT) to the unwary. 1,112 more words

Brain Imaging Alphabetical Soup: Making Sense of CAT, PET, MRI, fMRI, SPECT: fMRI

This article will focus on fMRI imaging.

fMRI, or functional magnetic resonance imaging, uses MRI equipment. fMRI is sensitive to the amount of deoxyhemoglobin in the blood. 195 more words

Mini-Series Science Articles

Can creativity be measured?

Secrets of the Creative Brain

As a psychiatrist and neuroscientist who studies creativity, I’ve had the pleasure of working with many gifted and high-profile subjects over the years, but Kurt Vonnegut—dear, funny, eccentric, lovable, tormented Kurt Vonnegut—will always be one of my favorites. 85 more words

Behavioral Economics