Tags » Games Based Learning

War of the Words: How to Gamify Online Discussions

Ask anyone who teaches online and they’re 99.9% certain to say that encouraging engaging and consistent discussion is the biggest challenge of teaching online. That percentage probably goes down in upper-level discipline-focused courses, but for those of us who teach freshman- and sophomore-level core curriculum courses, this percentage is pretty accurate no matter what the class or the students’  level of online learning experience. 2,055 more words

Instructional Design

Turning Your Class into a Game, Part 4: Giving Students Meaningful Choices

This post is a bonus post of sorts, since I only intended to write three posts in this series. But, as I was writing each, I was also designing the game that my fall FYC students will play and, as I was doing so, I began to really understand just how important having meaningful choices is in the games that I like to play. 2,097 more words

Instructional Design

Turning Your Class into a Game, Part 3: Rewarding Effort

In my last two posts, I covered two aspects of turning your class into a game: creating the experience and designing experience systems. In this post, I’m going to cover the third aspect: rewarding effort. 1,968 more words

Instructional Design

Turning Your Class into a Game, Part 2: Experience Systems

In my last post, I began a discussion of how to turn your class into a game by addressing the most important component of a game: the experience. 1,527 more words

Instructional Design

Turning Your Class into a Game, Part 1: The Experience

Last week, I had the opportunity to evangelize about games-based learning and gamification in the classroom at the 2nd Annual CoRE Academy at my university. My audience was a wonderful mix of PK20 teachers and, from the nods of approval during the presentation and comments, questions, and requests for more information I received afterwards, I think I convinced some of them. 2,783 more words

Instructional Design

Lev Vygotsky and John Dewey: Video Gamers From Days Past?

Lev Vygotsky and John Dewey: Video Gamers From Days Past?

 

Education technology companies are eager to sell their products to teachers and students, and academics excited about games are eager to justify their study and use as learning tools. 2,252 more words