Tags » Gordon Parks

'Wow, Quel Babes!': American Teenagers in Paris in the 1950s

LIFE proclaimed it “one of the world’s foremost colonies of displaced persons.” Its denizens, the magazine said, were a peculiar people who loved adventure, yet preferred “their own way of life.” They spoke their mother tongue among themselves, but sometimes fractured the local language with such abandon that natives risked being “startled by a bilingual ‘Wow, quel babe!'” In fact, locals thought this boisterous clan was “a little crazy,” in large part because they drank “so many Cokes.” The mad colonists were members of that most exotic of tribes: American teenagers. 692 more words

Gordon Parks' Never-Before-Seen Photos Of 1950s Segregation The Huffington Post | By Priscilla Frank

Gordon Parks was only a teenager when he left his hometown of Fort Scott, Kansas. The youngest of 15, Parks chose to make a living for himself after his mother passed away, and wound up becoming the first African American photographer for Life Magazine. 1,204 more words

Nation

SHAFT (1971)

Director of Photography: Urs Furrer

Director: Gordon Parks

Perfect Shots

Gordon Parks, unpublished Life magazine images are powerful

by Ramona du Houx

As the first black man hired full-time by Life magazine, Gordon Parks was inspired to photograph all 11 of his classmates from grade school as a way of measuring the impact of school segregation. 171 more words

Unpublished LIFE images by Gordon Parks are powerful look into America

As the first black man hired full-time by Life magazine, Gordon Parks wanted to find and photograph all 11 of his classmates from grade school as a way of measuring the impact of school segregation. 168 more words

Abstracts: Lightgraphs

Aimless Winter Wandering

Wandering with wandering eyes brought us some fine amusements and nourishing reflections recently.

Marco Razo’s work at the Decatur branch library is worth pondering. The brush work suggests long experience, while the paintings’ forms seem to limit themselves to rudimentary symbolism. 287 more words

Art In Atlanta