Tags » Heathenry

At the Heathen Altar (poem)

With the flickering candlelight
And the smoke heady in my nostrils
I kneel down to pray.
Before me, the iron hammer
Planed wood
Golden light… 23 more words

Heathenry

On the Nature of Sacrifice

I’ve been thinking a lot about sacrifice lately. Yule is approaching and that is a time where I often give appropriate sacrifices to Odin and with Winternights coming up too, it’s time to start thinking about what the late autumn will entail, and to start making the necessary preparations should animal sacrifice be part of that. 2,121 more words

Polytheism

Reblog: A note on lore

“I’m always puzzled by the dogged insistence on looking at lore, especially the Eddas as religious documents. They are not, not even the Poetic Edda. They may contain information that can inspire and benefit us as religionists, but they were not written down with any sense of the sacred in mind (nor were they inspired texts). 185 more words

My Newest Polytheist.com column is up

My newest column is live today at polytheist.com: Wyrd Ways: Building a Better Heathenry. This month’s column is titled “Awe, Reverence, and Restoration.” You can read it… 233 more words

Polytheism

Songs for the gods - part two

I’ve recently found new beautiful songs for a few gods I honor :

NaudiR – Wardruna 

“Djupt or djupet / Deep from the deep
Hjerte hamrar / The heart pounds… 315 more words

Heathenry

A Problem with a Human-centric View of the Spirit Worlds

To enter into the writing of this essay with the pretense that this is anything other than a rebuttal would be dishonest, so let me be as transparent on that front as I can be. 2,866 more words

Modern Day Worship

Beth reblogged this on Wytch of the North and commented:

A thought-provoking essay from Jo (the first of two) in response to Erin Lale's article "Humans, Please Stop Abusing the Rainbow Bridge," published in the latest issue of Eternal Haunted Summer. What offends me most about Lale's essay, personally, is the idea that even IF our pets really were going to Bifrost itself at their death, they would 1) stay there, instead of moving on to other places (as specified in the "Rainbow Bridge" motif she is complaining about) and, most of all, 2) that they would be lying there STILL DEAD on Bifrost. The idea that this could happen, or would be allowed to happen, just because humans envisioned it, is ridiculous and borders on the blasphemous (for me personally), but setting that aside for a moment, the imagery of Bifrost littered with dead animals is one I find extremely triggery. (Jo will be dealing with this idea more in depth in her follow-up post.) The "Rainbow Bridge" motif (something vets send out on sympathy cards to clients who have lost their pets) is a simple, comforting idea that has nothing at all to do with Bifrost (which is for the use of the gods alone, not the dead--as Jo points out). There are so few tools available to help people deal with this particular type of grief (which is not at all taken seriously in our society); why try to take this one away? And I'll stop ranting now, because Jo has covered all of this and more in her post--go read it! (And also? This gorgeous painting of Odin and Sleipnir riding in the Wild Hunt with Angel, by Lykeia, hangs in my living room; envy me, Odin's peeps!)