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This Day in Crime History: November 15, 1959

On this date in 1959, two ex-convicts murdered four members of the Clutter family at their home in Kansas. The murderers, Richard Hickock and Perry Smith, broke into the Clutter home after being told of Herbert Clutter’s cash-filled safe. 145 more words

True Crime

Truman Capote: In Cold Blood

On the 15th of November 1959, Mr. and Mrs. Clutter, their son Kenyon and daughter Nancy, were murdered in their farm house in Holcomb, Kansas. The two men responsible for their deaths, Richard ‘Dick’ Hickock and Perry Edward Smith, were executed by hanging five and a half years later. 891 more words

Literature

55th anniversary of Clutter Family murders Saturday

HOLCOMB, Kansas – Saturday marked the 55th anniversary of the Clutter Family murders.

A Holcomb farmer and his wife and two children were killed in their home by two ex-convicts who were trying to rob the home. 110 more words

Kansas

October Book Review - In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

Like Yael, my month of hosting/book-choosing coincidentally fell on my one year anniversary in the Unputdownable Book Club. This felt really special; my life has been greatly enriched by this group of women (and their vast literary and culinary selections) over the past year. 923 more words

Book Review

In Cold Blood: The Storytelling Capacity of Creative Nonfiction

On November 15th 1959, Holcomb, Kansas gained infamy when four members of a prominent farming family—the Clutters—were brutally killed at the hands of Richard (Dick) Hickock and Perry Smith. 1,341 more words

31 Days of Horror: Film 25: The Town That Dreaded Sundown (1976)

It’s time for the 31 Days of Horror: 2014 Edition. For those of you who weren’t around for last year’s journey, the plan is to watch at least 31 horror movies I’ve never seen before and review them all. 656 more words

31 Days Of Horror

The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee (Mills)

Why do we read biographies? Why do I read biographies of authors? Why did I read Charles Shields’ bio of Lee, one that I now know Lee had no interest in? 188 more words

Non-fiction