Tags » Leadership--Confederate

Battle of Second Kernstown

Welcome back guest author Kyle Rothemich.

After the Battle of Rutherford’s Farm on July 20th, Lt. Gen. Jubal Early’s Army of the Valley was located south of Strasburg near Fisher’s Hill. 1,499 more words

Battlefields & Historic Places

Shot Pouch's Eighth Shot

To say that Major General William Henry Talbot “Shot Pouch” Walker was a difficult man is an understatement. Known for his quarrelsome personality, he was a West Point classmate of Braxton Bragg and Joe Hooker and had demonstrated personal bravery on many fields and in many wars. 432 more words

Battles

The Death of Francis Marion Walker

It seemed that the slow bleeding of the Confederate officer corps reached its zenith on July 22. Throughout the campaign, in the nearly continuous fighting from Dalton to the Gate City, the Army of Tennessee was slowly losing its best and brightest. 286 more words

Battles

“Did great honor to themselves and the cause for which they fought”—Manning Force and the fight for Bald Hill

Part one of a two-part series

Resaca, Pickett’s Mill, Kolb’s Farm, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain—a road of bloody encounters that all led to here. Numerous battles that paved the way to the Gateway to the South: Atlanta. 980 more words

Battlefields & Historic Places

Battle of Rutherford’s Farm, Carters Farm or Stephenson’s Depot

Today we welcome back guest author Kyle Rothemich.

Following his victory at Cool Spring on July 18th, Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early started to withdraw deeper into the Shenandoah Valley. 1,183 more words

Battlefields & Historic Places

Battle of Cool Spring—July 18th

Today we welcome back guest author Kyle Rothemich.

Following Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early’s withdrawal into the Shenandoah Valley in early July 1864, thousands of Union soldiers followed in pursuit. 995 more words

Battlefields & Historic Places

ECW Weekender: In the Footsteps of Nullification with John C. Calhoun

Many historians have traced the roots of the Civil War back to the Nullification Crisis of 1832, triggered by South Carolina’s Ordinance of Nullification. The ordinance contended that a state had a right to ignore a Federal law if it felt the law was unconstitutional. 425 more words

Battlefields & Historic Places