Tags » Neorealism

NEEM ANNAPURNA / BITTER MORSEL (Dir. Buddhadev Dasgupta, 1979, India)

Before Buddhadev Dasgupta became a filmmaker he was a university teacher, lecturing on economics. His association with the Calcutta Film Society in the 1960s led to Dasgupta recognising the function cinema could play as an agent of wider social agitation and potential change. 236 more words

Indian CInema

DO BIGHA ZAMIN / TWO ACRES OF LAND (Dir. Bimal Roy, 1953, India)

INTRODUCTION

The influence and enduring character of some films are unquestionable and Bimal Roy’s 1953 masterpiece ‘Do Bigha Zamin’ was one of the first mainstream Indian films to receive international acclaim; it was awarded the Prix Internationale at the 1954 Cannes Film Festival. 1,866 more words

Indian CInema

DO ANKHEN BARAH HAATH / Two Eyes, Twelve Hands (Dir. V Shantaram, 1957, India) - Reformist Metonymy

Do Ankhen Barah Haath is one of director V Shantaram’s best known works. It has been labelled a classic yet in terms of popular Indian film discourse the film is rarely discussed unlike similarly revered Hindi films such as Mother India or Mughal E Azam. 462 more words

Indian CInema

Rejecting Neorealism: Fellini And Antonioni

“Video essay on the seminal Italian neorealist film LOVE IN THE CITY, which includes films by Michelangelo Antonioni and Federico Fellini”

Neorealism

Bicycle Thieves

I’ve heard that Bicycle Thief is a classic film but never saw it — till now. I got the DVD, and see that the title’s been correctly translated to… 287 more words

Classic

Come Back, Africa (Lionel Rogosin, 1959) + An American in Sophiatown (Michael Rogosin, 2007)

Lionel Rogosin’s second film is a bona fide milestone of African cinema.

It’s so noble, and so powerful, that its flaws are entirely excusable; in any case, the reasons behind the film’s slightly uneven tone are intriguing. 714 more words

21st-century Films

How often do world leaders lie?

“Lying comes easy to leaders who think that they live in a Hobbesian world.” – John Mearsheimer

In his 2011 book, Why Leaders Lie, John Mearsheimer explores the question of lying as a tool for statecraft. 1,362 more words

International Relations