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Week 10: Never Say Never Again

Obviously the title speaks for itself, in terms of irony, when considering Sean Connery making a thinly veiled move to re-don his 007 tuxedo for the black sheep of the Bond series. 270 more words

Week 10: Never Say Never Again

Schatz’s representation of “New Hollywood” is relevant to Never Say Never Again, because of the sheer star power that the film possessed. Connery was brought back to the Bond role outside of the ongoing Broccoli production, because of audience appreciation for his portrayal of the character, thus making the film marketable, something that Schatz discusses at length in his article. 88 more words

Week 10: Never Say Never Again

The most New Hollywood-esque aspect of Never Say Never Again has little to do with the film itself; rather, the fact that two Bond films were released in the same year is indicative of the decline of the vertically integrated studio system and the rise of independent production. 160 more words

Week 10: Never Say Never Again

On its own, Sean Connery’s non-franchise addition to the James Bond universe, Never Say Never Again, is not an incredibly exciting movie, however; after rewatching it within the context of this class, I thought it was one of our most interesting screenings to date. 229 more words

Week 10: Never Say Never Again

In 1983 two Bond films were released, Octopussy (which was part of the official franchise), and Never Say Never Again (a remake of Thunderball by producer Kevin McClory, which was permitted due to a law suit two decades prior). 386 more words

Week 10: Never Say Never Again

Never Say Never Again is an almost perfect correlation to Thomas Schatz’ article on the New Hollywood. It represents in a microcosm the changes reflected in the studio system after the Second World War, not the least of which being the challenge on monopoly. 166 more words

Week 10: Never Say Never Again

Never Say Never Again is an almost perfect correlation to Thomas Schatz’ article on the New Hollywood. It represents in a microcosm the changes reflected in the studio system after the Second World War, not the least of which being the challenge on monopoly. 166 more words

Never Say Never Again