Tags » Newbery Medal Winners

1969: The High King (complete with oracular pigs)

VERDICT: Trash

Sally’s Rating: 2.5/5

Lloyd Alexander’s Chronicles of Prydain series wraps up in the fifth and final book, The High King. Filled to the max with every trope that a high fantasy series can possibly offer, the fight between good and evil comes down to a final battle that needs the courage and help of Taran, Assistant Pig-Keeper. 284 more words

Book Review

1968: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (Running Away Pays)

VERDICT: Treasure

Laurinda’s Rating: 3.5/5

This mildly entertaining Newbery entry tells the story of the Kincaid children, who run away from their suburban home to live in the Met. 512 more words

Book Review

1968: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (wherein the title is better than the actual plot)

VERDICT: Treasure

Sally’s Rating: 3.5/5

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler is a funny, charming, and most of all entertaining look into the antics of two runaways who decide to live in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 371 more words

Book Review

1967: Up A Road Slowly (Diary of a Needy Kid)

VERDICT: Trash

Laurinda’s Rating: 2.5/5

The 1967 Newbery Medal Winner, Up a Road Slowly, is a very mixed story. The initial section of the book covers Julie’s move to the country and her life with Aunt Cordelia, a strict but loving spinster who teaches in the rural school. 820 more words

Book Review

1967: Up a Road Slowly (growing pains)

VERDICT: Treasure?

Sally’s Rating: 3/5

Irene Hunt’s Up a Road Slowly explores the trials and tribulations of growing up without a mother. When Julie’s mother dies, she is forced to live with her Aunt Cordelia – a spinster in the country – and learns that change is inevitable in regards to family, friends and love. 419 more words

Book Review

1966: I, Juan de Pareja (Living to Paint, Painting to Live)

VERDICT: Treasure

Laurinda’s Rating: 3.5/5

I, Juan de Pareja, the 1966 Newbery Winner, tells the invented story of Juan de Pareja. Juan was born to a slave in 16th century Spain and spent his early years in Seville, the pampered pet of a rich woman. 359 more words

Book Review

1966: I, Juan de Pareja (a portrait of a slave)

VERDICT: Trash

Sally’s Rating: 2.5/5

Elizabeth Borton de Trevino’s I, Juan de Pareja tells the inspiring story of a slave turned artist in 17th century Spain. 247 more words

Book Review