And When I Think, I Fall Asleep

Title: One Hundred Years of Solitude

Author: Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Genre: Fiction/ Literature

Length: 458 pages

When I was a kid I had a poster of a chimpanzee on my wall.  641 more words

Reviews

Hand Written

This is a short story that was published today in the Leeds Trinity University paper, Trinity Talk Issue 2! It’s rather surreal, but then I’ve been interested in magical realism and surreal fiction since reading… 1,034 more words

Writing

What is your transition book?

I’ve just read an interesting piece on the Guardian book blog page, asking: ‘Which Book Marked Your Transition from Child to Adult?’

It includes books that its readers have nominated as the key novels that helped them in their transition from children’s to adult literature.  497 more words

General And Welcome

And the third horseman holds the scales

Who judges you? Famine comes both from weather and man. Capitalism as a cure for famine seems odd, but look up famine in Wikipedia to see how they explain it. 450 more words

Symbols

Rosemary For Remembrance: Part 1

The central motif of this piece is solitude and memory. What follows is not an essay per se, but an attempt to explore the motif in a different way: sometimes through a poem or song lyric; sometimes through an excerpt from a novel; sometimes a prose piece on scientific research; or even, in one case, through a moment in a film. 2,111 more words

Songs

Welcome to the Bolivian Mountains, Where Magical Realism Is a Way of Life

In 1940s-era Latin America, a new genre of literature started to take off. Magic realism, initially inspired by the Surrealist art movement, started to gain major traction when Gabriel Garcia Marquez published his epic… 671 more words

Spirituality

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

One hundred years of the Buendía family living, loving and obsessing in the magical Macondo.

Favorite quotes:

Best opening line ever: “Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice.”

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