Tags » Philosophical Counseling

The tension between Zen and Socrates

I am becoming more aware each day of the tension between the Socratic way of life and Zen practice. For Socrates, there is in the beginning the  501 more words

Philosophical Counseling

Boasting in Laches: Homer vs. Socrates

Nicias has just been refuted by Socrates, and Laches, who had earlier fallen prey to Socratic questioning, is gloating. Laches:

But I, my dear Nicias, felt sure you would make the discovery after you were so scornful of me while I was answering Socrates. 699 more words

Philosophical Counseling

Socratic mental discipline: Laches and the question of courage

Courage is a kind of knowledge, Nicias says. It’s the kind that’s concerned with the fearful and the hopeful. But that’s nonsense, Laches replies. Because I take wisdom to be different from courage. 1,172 more words

Philosophical Counseling

Obsolescence: Exiting the Market System

We have some readily accepted theories about how one good or service in the marketplace is replaced by another. The first theory is that some company providing some good or service X  978 more words

Philosophical Counseling

'The unexamined life is not worth living for man' (IV): On mental discipline

As I began re-reading the early Socratic dialogues, I initially thought that the Socratic way of life would have to be supplemented by philosophical and religious traditions that have devoted considerable thought to the cultivation of mental discipline. 637 more words

Philosophical Counseling

'The unexamined life is not worth living for man' (III): Kinds of Socratic openness

When Socrates speaks of virtue or about virtuous living, his immediate point of reference is the ancient Greek virtues of temperance, courage, justice, and wisdom. Thus, one would be naturally inclined to ask questions about the relationship between Socratic discussion and virtuous living, about the definitions of each virtue, and about the defensibility of the ‘unity of virtue’ thesis.  530 more words

Philosophical Counseling

'The unexamined life is not worth living for man' (II)

‘ A successful life of reason and philosophy will therefore also be a life of moral virtue at its highest. The truest philosopher will also be the most morally, socially virtuous person—precisely because only a philosopher can have achieved the reasoned, argued understanding of just why those (or rather, some philosophically improved version of them) really are part of the good condition of the soul.’ 662 more words

Philosophical Counseling