Tags » Right To Be Forgotten

Lessons from Kundera: On the right to be forgotten

All this talk about the internet and the ‘right to be forgotten’ has me thinking about Milan Kundera.

Honestly, it doesn’t take much to set me thinking on one of my favourite authors. 950 more words

Literature

Wikipedia and the Right to be Forgotten… or why Jimmy Wales might want to support a right to delete - Paul Bernal

One of the more strident critics of the Google Spain ruling by the ECJ, bringing into action at least a form of the much derided ‘right to be forgotten’, has been Jimmy Wales, co-founder of Wikipedia. 1,531 more words

Social Media

Cloud + data = empowerment?

Data in the cloud gets a lot of press, including on this blog. And rightly so – recent revelations demonstrate there is a case to ensure data is used and controlled properly in cloud. 106 more words

Cloud

Right to be forgotten: Legal Validity and Practical Challenges

Background

In 2010, a Spaniard, Mario Costeja González approached the Spanish Data Protection Agency with a complaint against Google and a local newspaper. A Google search of his name led to an auction notice of his repossessed home on the local newspaper. 1,486 more words

Articles

Lazy Random Feed Time...

I know it has been several weeks.   …   I’m busy and stuff.   And so for this post I will try to show fairly fresh feeds I’ve been reading, but in no particular order and with no particular theme … because, I’m busy and stuff. 371 more words

Internet Law Bits

Wikipedia and the Right to be Forgotten…

…or why Jimmy Wales might want to support a right to delete.

One of the more strident critics of the Google Spain ruling by the ECJ, bringing into action at least a form of the much derided ‘right to be forgotten’, has been Jimmy Wales, co-founder of Wikipedia. 1,525 more words

Privacy

Press and Google misrepresent European Court’s Google judgement .

A tsunami of misinformation has overwhelmed the ECJ’s ruling on Google: high-tech corporate America, NGOs and parts of the UK media are claiming that the judgement constitutes shocking defeat for the concept of freedom of expression. 1,107 more words

Google

casewatchasia reblogged this on Case Watch Asia.