Tags » Submission Process

Things to Consider - Behind the Scenes

I’ve heard many artists complain that the larger, better known exhibitions are impersonal and not particularly user-friendly.

While not advocating bad customer service, it should be noted that the shear numbers of entries to many of these shows makes it impossible for the administrators to answer specific questions from artists in a timely manner, if at all. 431 more words

Notes From The Editor

Things to Consider - Photographing Your Art

Though I know I sound like a broken record, I can not emphasise enough, the importance of having good photographs of your artwork.

Of course this is particularly important when the submission process itself is based on images of your work, but even if the selection process is based on viewing the original artwork, once the piece has been delivered to the event venue, it is unlikely that you will have an opportunity to photograph it should it be sold, or worse damaged. 560 more words

Open Exhibitions

Things to Consider: Have a Strategy Before Entering

Last month in OPEN EXHIBITION we listed as many of the ongoing competitions and exhibitions that we could find details for, but it’s important as you plan your entries for the year ahead to have a strategy for entering these events. 146 more words

Notes From The Editor

Things To Consider...

Every exhibition will have, and should inform artists of their selection process and any special criteria for selection. It is important to fully understand how the process works, as it can vary considerably from one exhibition to another. 278 more words

Notes From The Editor

Things To Consider...

Last month I wrote about some of the advantages of entering open exhibitions. This month I want to focus on the entry details, the submission and should your work be selected the sale processes. 1,270 more words

Open Exhibitions

How to Stay Sane During the Submission Process

When I was trying to get a literary agent (sixty rejections, a good amount of requests, three offers, and a strange conversation with a new agent talking a mile a minute while she tried to hail a taxi cab during New York City’s rush hour), I never saw beyond getting “the call,” that magical moment when an agent offers to sign you. 888 more words

Writing