Tags » Syriac

On Saint Mark's, Jerusalem, № 181 (content, notes, & endpapers)

Manuscript № 181 of Saint Mark’s Monastery in Jerusalem (SMMJ) is an East Syriac manuscript, written, it seems, by a scribe named ʿAbdišoʿ of Ātēl. The main content of the manuscript is the… 298 more words

Syriac

A Bit On ISIS Marking Christians for Extermination and Expropriation in Iraq

 

As jihadist Sunni Islamist terrorists from ISIS/ISIL strive to create a sharia inspired Caliphate as they take over territory in Iraq and Syria, they are slaughtering innocent Christians.   133 more words

Aphorisms

Talking to a dog in Aramaic

At some points in the history of lexicography, the acceptable fodder for lexicographers has been restricted, investigations into non-literary and purely colloquial words being eschewed. In the course of the last few centuries, at least, in more than one lexicographic arena, this custom has fortunately fallen into disuse, with the study of slang, etc. 451 more words

Syriac

A Syriac fragment on Sisoes?

In my Twitter feed appeared one of the images of Sisoes, who is commemorated on July 6, over the tomb of Alexander the Great, such as… 147 more words

Syriac

The Syriac Side of Things

Marginalia Review of Books just published an interview with Sebastian Brock, who was one of the main architects for the “rediscovery” of Syriac Christianity in Anglophone scholarship since the late 1960s.   155 more words

Christianity

The Impact of Aramaic (especially Syriac) on the Qur'ān

The Impact of Aramaic (especially Syriac) on the Qur’ān

Emran El-Badawi

* Article first published online: 2 JUL 2014

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/rec3.12109/abstract

Abstract

The impact of Aramaic (especially Syriac) on the Qur’ān has long been a matter of debate among scholars, especially among those of the western academe but also within circles of traditional Muslim scholarship. 125 more words

Religion

"The Garšūnī language"

My involvement in cataloging Syriac and Arabic manuscripts over the last few years has impressed upon me how often and actively Syriac Orthodox and Chaldean scribes (and presumably, readers) used Garšūnī: it is anything but an isolated occurrence in these collections. 417 more words

Arabic

Sami reblogged this on burj bābil.