Tags » Textual Criticism

OUTLINE OF NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES - UNIT 6

OUTLINE OF NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES – UNIT 6

The following is my outline of the critical study of the New Testament based upon the following works: Werner Georg Kümmel,  364 more words

NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES

Origen and the First or Second Psalm

Most of the examples of Origen’s text-critical observations occur in the Gospels, but I have found one in Acts. In commenting on Acts 13:33, Origen notes that Acts attributes Psa 2:7 to the first psalm (ὡς γὰρ γέγραπται φήσιν ἐν πρώτῳ ψαλμῷ) as does Codex Bezae (D), 244 more words

New Testament

Origen and the Text of Acts

It has been a while since I have posted here. Largely  because I have been busy working on my dissertation on Origen’s text of Acts. In fact, it was my work on Origen, that caused me to name this blog Stan’s Σχόλια (scholia) since Origen left many scholia, or marginal notes, or catenae, and also fragments preserved by other writers. 267 more words

New Testament

Text Tuesday - those pesky scribes

Very interesting talk from Dr. Daniel B. Wallace – How badly did the scribes change the New Testament?

One of my pieces of learning over this last year is in regard to what must be believed, can be believed and how some things are to be believed – by Christians. 86 more words

Theology

Historical validity of Judeo-Christian Scripture

Abstract of “Historical Validity of Scripture”

The most scrutinized and critiqued book of all human history, the Judeo-Christian Scriptures is clearly unique. Based on the evidence of other human works, it stands out as clearly impressive. 2,740 more words

Essay's

Textual Criticism, the New Testament, and the Qur'an

I’ve recently reviewed a fascinating book:  Keith E. Small, Textual Criticism and Qur’an Manuscripts (Lanham/Boulder/New York/Toronto/Plymouth:  Lexington Books, 2012), the review appearing in Scottish Journal of Theology  949 more words

humbledonkey reblogged this on Humble Donkey and commented:

[caption id="attachment_1696" align="aligncenter" width="286"]holy_books_cover_1 Dr. Small's book as pictured is an abridgement of the larger version reviewed by Dr. Hurtado.[/caption]

For Christians thinking about the New Testament in terms of its textual landscape, it is worth clicking through to Larry Hurtado's blog below to read his post in full. Dr. Hurtado is a scholar of the New Testament and Christian Origins.

If you have the priviledge of discussing texts - biblical and quaranic with good Muslim folk - it is an especially interesting read. The two key points for me (briefly mentioned) are about the role of the presence or absence of 'state sponsorship' for want of a better phrase and also the desire and need for correctives that arose in both traditions. In Islam - this was toward the text (I am thinking about Uthman) and in Christianity, this was toward belief and doctrine - (I am thinking about the great church councils - Nicea for example). The relationship between power and orthodoxy are interlinked for both communities. But both communities were exercised about potential threats to orthodoxy in different ways.

The early(ish) Islamic community embarked on its quest for textual orthodoxy in the full bloom of its power and has been consequently very successful. Whereas Christianity needed or at least saw fit to embark on its quest for doctrinal (not textual) orthodoxy relatively late and with relatively liitle power in place. These adventures in securing orthodoxy seem poorly understood by many, misrepresented by some and challenging to all - for different reasons. A key staple of Islamic rhetoric appears to be one of Islamic textual stability. A key polemic against Christianity is one of instability of doctrine and belief. But what if in spite of all the offensive and defensive bluster Christianity was somewhat more stable that its critics wish to allow and Islam was a little less stable than its adherents can allow? It certainly would make for more interesting conversations - with more learning and listening, wondering and journeying.

Over to you Dr. Hurtado.

 Textual Criticism, the New Testament, and the Qur'an

Video: Full Interview of Dr. James White on Textual Criticism by Steven Anderson

Steven Anderson, a King James Only advocate, interviewed James White as part of a video documentary on the (supposed) corruption of non-KJV translations.  The documentary only contains a very brief segment of the 2.5 hour interview that took place between them.  7 more words

Audio & Video