Tags » Thomas Pynchon

What’s wrong with dope and women?

A tragic sigh. “Information. What’s wrong with dope and women? Is it any wonder the world’s gone insane, with information come to be the only real medium of exchange?” 12 more words

Literature

he took her wrist

“She told him later that as soon as he took her wrist that night, she came. And the first time he touched her cunt, squeezed Jessica’s soft cunt through her knickers, the trembling began again high in her thighs, growing, taking her over. 30 more words

Literature

the human life span

“It seemed to him obvious that the human life span runs through the varieties of mental disorder as understood in his day— the solipsism of infancy, the sexual hysterias of adolescence and entry-level adulthood, the paranoia of middle age, the dementia of late life … all working up to death, which at last turns out to be “sanity.””

— Thomas Pynchon, Bleeding Edge

Literature

her mental prognosis

“In the wake of her separation, back in what still isn’t quite The Day, from her then husband, Horst Loeffler, after too many hours indoors with the blinds drawn listening on endless repeat to Stevie Nicks singing “Landslide” on a compilation tape she ignored the rest of, drinking horrible Crown Royal Shirley Temples and chasing them with more grenadine directly from the bottle and going through a bushel per day of Kleenex, Maxine finally allowed her friend Heidi to convince her that a Caribbean cruise would somehow upgrade her mental prognosis.”

— Thomas Pynchon, Bleeding Edge

Literature

blame

“Oh I blame the fuckin Internet. No question.”

— Thomas Pynchon, Bleeding Edge

Literature

Thomas Pynchon on David Foster Wallace

For those of you who are interested in the work of Thomas Pynchon, David Foster Wallace, or both, check out this article.  It came out a few years ago, shortly before the release of Pale Kings, Wallace’s posthumous novel.   20 more words

Authors

Is It Okay To Be a Luddite?

Such was the title of Thomas Pynchon’s New York Times essay from October 28, 1984. While the question may not yet have been satisfactorily answered — not for all interested parties, at least — thirty years later it still begs asking. 587 more words