Tags » Wilfred Owen

Passing bells and Anzac Biscuits

Anthem for Doomed Youth
BY WILFRED OWEN
What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
Only the stuttering rifles’ rapid rattle… 262 more words

Anthem for Doomed Youth

What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
…Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
…Only the stuttering rifles’ rapid rattle
Can patter out their hasty orisons. 85 more words

Poetry

Poets and their visions 19 – Walt Whitman

I had thought initially of leaving out American poets from this series. The principal reason for this is that, with one clear exception, I am not sure that they achieve excellence in their fields. 1,501 more words

Poetry

Arms and the Boy

Arms and the Boy
by Wilfred Owen

Let the boy try along this bayonet-blade
How cold steel is, and keen with hunger of blood;
Blue with all malice, like a madman’s flash; 74 more words

Art

Two Tiny Poems on War -- Sad and Funny Ones; and One Verse That Is Not Funny at All

THE ANIMALS HAVE ARRIVED!  This is the gate they have been seeking — to a world without war!

And here, my friends, are two of their favorite poems.   411 more words

The Last Laugh

The Last Laugh
by Wilfred Owen

‘Oh! Jesus Christ! I’m hit,’ he said; and died.
Whether he vainly cursed or prayed indeed,
The Bullets chirped-In vain, vain, vain! 69 more words

Art

Holiday or holy day

Wilfred Owen was a British poet who built his reputation as a severe critic of the First World War. (In fact, he lost his life in France two weeks before the Armistice was signed.) As a result of the carnage he witnessed in the trenches young Owen, like so many men of that generation, lost his supernatural faith.  330 more words

Christianity