Tags » Women Authors

Where did American Women Writers Lurk?

Austen eventually eclipsed her American counterparts, partially because of her great talent, partially because dialogues and epistolary fiction were diminishing in popularity, and partially because Columbia underwent a far more radical transformation than Britannia between the 1790s and 1820s. 527 more words

Jane Austen (1775-1817)

Emma and The Female Choice, concluded

Wages in America stayed low in large segments of the population, and jobs remained seasonable and precarious even before a financial crisis arose in 1819. In England, an… 1,044 more words

Jane Austen (1775-1817)

Emma, and the Female Choice

Emma was published in late-1815, and dedicated, “To His Royal Highness, the Prince Regent,” who would later be crowned King George IV. As in fairy tales, in Austen novels men are always active (they hold virtually all agency) while single women are expected to be passive (acted upon), and once women marry they… 730 more words

Jane Austen (1775-1817)

Awakening young Women to the “Re-perusal” of Industry

Jane Austen drafted Sense and Sensibility as an epistolary novel in about 1795 and Pride and Prejudice was drafted as an epistolary novel called First Impressions… 737 more words

Jane Austen (1775-1817)

Columbia’s Folklorist & Emma comes to America

Mathew Carey (1760-1839) launched the career of chapman Mason Locke Weems (1754-1825), who charmed Columbia’s common folk with his soapbox and plethora of little books on religion and right living as he carried the news of the day. 494 more words

Jane Austen (1775-1817)

Marketing a Female Ideal in a New America

Female industry would temper the steel of American democracy, which was still considered to be a political experiment; time and its prudent usage would be the means for a young America to steer a safe course. 882 more words

Jane Austen (1775-1817)

Austen Counters American Captivity Novels

Jane Austen’s work was not in sync with the emerging American nationalism that was a new social construct of imagined communities (not naturally expressed in language, race or religion) as Columbia’s citizenry moved toward a single overarching national identity. 812 more words

Jane Austen (1775-1817)