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The troops depart for the First World War

September 23rd marks the day that the Canterbury troopships, Athenic and Tahiti, left Lyttelton in 1914. There had been rumours of the leaving date for some time, but the actual date was not publicised, … 737 more words

Christchurch

a sea of poppies

This World War I memorial at the Tower of London is absolutely gorgeous. It will eventually feature 888,246 ceramic poppies, one for each soldier from Britain or the British colonies who died in WWI. 84 more words

Trench Warfare in World War I Was a Smarter Strategy Than You Realize

http://io9.com/trench-warfare-in-world-war-i-was-a-smarter-strategy-th-1637657733

And this article ties in nicely with my Great War Great Read reading project.

Posted from WordPress for Android via my Samsung smartphone. Please excuse any misspellings. Ciao, Jon

Musings

mustard gas and mud

The horse came back alone. William was nowhere to be seen, and Henry didn’t want to think about what had happened to him. The trench was all mud, blood and death. 551 more words

Longform Writing

Lt. -Col. Sam Hughes’, Valcartier Camp, Birth of F.C. C.E.F. Battalions 1914.

In historical accounts, protestant, Orangeman Hughes the Imperialist, is depicted as a bigot, bipolar, scruple, out of control madman, a figment of his own personified imagination, while championed by his entourage, cohort cronies, compensated in militia honorary commissions, or political favours. 1,535 more words

First World War

Wednesday 23 September 1914 - We Lost 82

A two hour balloon flight is made in Hertfordshire which concludes that the enemy could locate central London targets on dark nights by flying compass courses from easily distinguished suburban points, or by following a main road or the River Thames. 175 more words

Review: Paris at the End of the World: How the City of Lights Soared in Its Darkest Hour, 1914-1918 ~ John Baxter

A preeminent writer on Paris, John Baxter brilliantly brings to life one of the most dramatic and fascinating periods in the city’s history.

From 1914 through 1918 the terrifying sounds of World War I could be heard from inside the French capital. 463 more words

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