Tags » Yiddish

Where We Belong, Where We Will Go, and How Fast?

I have tried to communicate the excitement of our reading groups. Every Tuesday after language class a group of us has been reading Di Heldn fun Chelm (The Wise Men of Chelm) and every Wednesday we’ve been reading from the weekly Torah portion in Yehoash’s Yiddish translation. 1,498 more words

Yiddish

Baby Girl Name: Kayla

Meaning: this name has one of two meanings: 1) “Who is like God?” in Hebrew; 2) “laurel” or “crown” in Yiddish

Origin: 1) short form of Makayla, which is a variant spelling of Michaela, Germanic feminine of Michael, an archangel in the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament; 2) variant spelling of the Yiddish name Kaila… 15 more words

Judeo-Christian

Radicalism in Tradition, Education, and Zionism: The Evolution of Jewry as Depicted by Puah Rakovsky

In her memoir, Puah Rakovsky highlights central tensions that characterized the evolution of Eastern European Jewry during her lifetime. Driven by such tensions, Rakovsky’s radicalism permeated through personal, social, and political realms. 1,628 more words

Jewish Theological Seminary

How Do You Say "Az m'lebt der lebt men ales"

Lately, we been getting questions from readers regarding the Polish, Yiddish and Russian words used in the book. Specifically, readers what to hear the word spoken, as in the context of the book. 103 more words

History

A Yiddish Tale Retold

Well, brothers and sisters, you know by now that I like to write. I especially like to write when I should be reading and researching. I heard a very condensed (as in, less than 5 sentences) version of this little fable my freshman year of college, and despite its brevity, it stuck with me ever since. 2,120 more words

All About that Beis (Medrash)

A riff on Meghan Trainor’s “All About that Bass,” inspired by my friend Emily Filler’s dissertation title: “All About that Beis (Medrash): modern Jewish Scripture, troubling texts, and the recovery of classical rabbinic hermeneutics.” I hereby present “All About that Beis (Medrash)” by Rebecca Epstein-Levi! 216 more words