Tags » Zooplankton

Bob...

Today someone in my BioOcean class found a fish egg that looked like Bob Marley…. No joke…

Jacked Up

Photo of the week: Freshwater zooplankton

Most freshwater zooplankton are too small to see with the naked eye.

To bring these amazing animal-like organisms to your attention, we’ve put a 1.02 mm cladoceran (water flea) under the microscope for our photo of the week. 105 more words

Photo Of The Week

Shell condition and survival of Puget Sound pteropods are impaired by ocean acidification conditions

We tested whether the thecosome pteropod Limacina helicina from Puget Sound, an urbanized estuary in the northwest continental US, experiences shell dissolution and altered mortality rates when exposed to the high CO2, low aragonite saturation state (Ωa) conditions that occur in Puget Sound and the northeast Pacific Ocean. 239 more words

Science

whale chasers

It would be hard for me to convey my level of excitement when Sarah invited Devin and I to go out on the boat with them. 678 more words

"Celebrity Zooplankton" by Richard F. Yates

Tonight’s Celebrity Zooplankton is Jeffery Wells!

Wells is a finisher at a luxury transportation vehicle manufacturer in Lake Michigan, as well as being a devoted husband and father to three adorable little larvae. 117 more words

Art

Zooplankton

Zooplankton /ˌzoʊ.əˈplŋktən/ are heterotrophic (sometimes detritivorous) plankton. Plankton are organisms drifting in oceans, seas, and bodies of fresh water. The word “zooplankton” is derived from the Greek zoon (ζῴον), meaning “animal”, and planktos (πλαγκτός), meaning “wanderer” or “drifter”.[1] Individual zooplankton are usually microscopic, but some (such as jellyfish) are larger and visible with the naked eye.

Zooplankton

Zooplankton /ˌzoʊ.əˈplŋktən/ are heterotrophic (sometimes detritivorous) plankton. Plankton are organisms drifting in oceans, seas, and bodies of fresh water. The word “zooplankton” is derived from the Greek zoon (ζῴον), meaning “animal”, and planktos (πλαγκτός), meaning “wanderer” or “drifter”.[1] Individual zooplankton are usually microscopic, but some (such as jellyfish) are larger and visible with the naked eye.