Tags » Zooplankton

"Celebrity Zooplankton" by Richard F. Yates

Tonight’s Celebrity Zooplankton is Jeffery Wells!

Wells is a finisher at a luxury transportation vehicle manufacturer in Lake Michigan, as well as being a devoted husband and father to three adorable little larvae. 117 more words

Art

Zooplankton

Zooplankton /ˌzoʊ.əˈplŋktən/ are heterotrophic (sometimes detritivorous) plankton. Plankton are organisms drifting in oceans, seas, and bodies of fresh water. The word “zooplankton” is derived from the Greek zoon (ζῴον), meaning “animal”, and planktos (πλαγκτός), meaning “wanderer” or “drifter”.[1] Individual zooplankton are usually microscopic, but some (such as jellyfish) are larger and visible with the naked eye.

Zooplankton

Zooplankton /ˌzoʊ.əˈplŋktən/ are heterotrophic (sometimes detritivorous) plankton. Plankton are organisms drifting in oceans, seas, and bodies of fresh water. The word “zooplankton” is derived from the Greek zoon (ζῴον), meaning “animal”, and planktos (πλαγκτός), meaning “wanderer” or “drifter”.[1] Individual zooplankton are usually microscopic, but some (such as jellyfish) are larger and visible with the naked eye.

Zooplankton

Zooplankton /ˌzoʊ.əˈplŋktən/ are heterotrophic (sometimes detritivorous) plankton. Plankton are organisms drifting in oceans, seas, and bodies of fresh water. The word “zooplankton” is derived from the Greek zoon (ζῴον), meaning “animal”, and planktos (πλαγκτός), meaning “wanderer” or “drifter”.[1] Individual zooplankton are usually microscopic, but some (such as jellyfish) are larger and visible with the naked eye.

Coping with climate change? Copepods experience drastic variations in their physicochemical environment on a diurnal basis

Migratory zooplankton, such as copepods experience widely varying conditions in their physicochemical environment on a diurnal basis. The amplitude of the fluctuations may affect the copepods’ ability to respond to climate change. 174 more words

Science

Microplastic Ingestion

For those of you who are currently sitting at a desk chewing on their plastic  pen (or other plastic object). Stop. Think carefully about what you are doing (I have to remind myself about this on a daily basis). 1,034 more words

Parental exposure to elevated pCO2 influences the reproductive success of copepods

Substantial variations are reported for egg production and hatching rates of copepods exposed to elevated carbon dioxide concentrations (pCO2). One possible explanation, as found in other marine taxa, is that prior parental exposure to elevated pCO2 (and/or decreased pH) affects reproductive performance. 179 more words

Science