Tags » 10/11: Gender, Colonial Education, And The Bildungsroma

10/13: Colonized Education

I really enjoyed this novel, though I think reading Nervous Conditions prior would’ve made me to appreciate it more. Regardless, I think that this book did an excellent job of portraying the effects that colonization and segregation of education can have on young children. 415 more words

Community and the lack thereof

This novel was beautifully written, I could see myself picking up both its predecessor and successor to read over the summer. I appreciated the narrative voice throughout and the use of the main character’s journal-like reflection within the novel. 404 more words

The Key to Her Future

Throughout The Book of Not, Tambu incessantly emphasizes the importance of gaining a Western education as the “key to her future” (Dangarembga 27). She places impossibly high standards on herself so that she may attain success in the eyes of those she’s trying so hard to impress (the Sisters at Sacred heart, as well as her uncle Babamukuru). 349 more words

10/11: Gender, Colonial Education, And The Bildungsroman

Wasteful

The Book of Not depicts quite a few scenes of waste and wastefulness, and both this novel and Nervous Conditions see preoccupied with the anxiety of waste. 431 more words

10/11: Gender, Colonial Education, And The Bildungsroman

Building Identity in The Book of Not

I think that Kelsey and Sadie’s posts have already touched on this, but after reading the novel, I find myself particularly interested in Tambu’s (often misplaced) reflexive gratitude and the way that it seems inextricably bound up with the limitations of being an African woman and a colonized subject–what are viewed, in the setting of the novel, as inferior positions. 292 more words

10/11: Gender, Colonial Education, And The Bildungsroman

Motherhood and Colonialism

In The Book of Not, Dangarembga utilizes motherhood as a symbol of power relations, birth, and rebirth, establishing a dichotomy between infant and provider. The way that birth and mothering interact in a colonial/decolonial space provides insight into the complexities of power relations as a nation attempts to remove its oppressors. 350 more words

Trapped

In Tsitsi Dangarembga’s The Book of Not, we follow the life and struggles of Tambudzai Sigauke, or Tambu. Tambu is introduced to the reader as an academically ambitious teenager who is attending a formerly all-white school called The Young Ladies’ College of the Sacred Heart. 283 more words

10/11: Gender, Colonial Education, And The Bildungsroman