Tags » A. E. Housman

A Short Analysis of A. E. Housman’s ‘Tell Me Not Here, It Needs Not Saying’

‘Tell me not here, it needs not saying’ is one of the most famous poems from A. E. Housman’s second volume, Last Poems (1922). In this poem, which comes near the end of the collection, Housman reflects on his relationship with nature, before concluding that, although nature does not care or even know about him, he feels a close bond with it. 662 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of A. E. Housman’s ‘On Wenlock Edge the Wood’s in Trouble’

‘On Wenlock Edge the wood’s in trouble’: it’s one of A. E. Housman’s most arresting opening lines. Why, or indeed how, is the wood ‘in trouble’? 638 more words

Literature

POETRY: Easter Hymn by A. E. Housman

If in that Syrian garden, ages slain,
You sleep, and know not you are dead in vain,
Nor even in dreams behold how dark and bright… 78 more words

Blog Posts

A Short Analysis of A. E. Housman’s ‘To an Athlete Dying Young’

One of the most famous and best-loved poems in A. E. Housman’s A Shropshire Lad, ‘To an Athlete Dying Young’ is a powerful eulogy for a man who is the human embodiment of physical fitness and prowess, but who faces an early death owing to illness. 587 more words

Literature

A.E. Housman: "Shake hands, we shall never be friends, all’s over"

Shake hands, we shall never be friends, all’s over;
I only vex you the more I try.
All’s wrong that ever I’ve done or said, 299 more words

Social Justice