Tags » Alec Newman

Um lugar solitário para morrer

Um lugar solitário para morrer (A lonely place to die)

País de origem: Reino Unido

Data de lançamento: 2 de Novembro de 2011

Diretor: Julian Gilbey… 189 more words

Filmes

Hapgood

Spies & particle physics. Not natural bedfellows to most people – but then, Tom Stoppard isn’t ‘most people’. This revival production of Hapgood has been tweaked ever so slightly from its original UK run in 1988, though mainly to change outdated jokes, plus one scene has been moved to make things a little clearer for the audience. 723 more words

Review - Hapgood - Hampstead Theater

The Hampstead is right in its happy place with this productionl of Hapgood, a revival of a Stoppard work from the balancing point in his career where he was still riding the line between intellectual inquiry and entertainment in his plays. 607 more words

THE MOTHER FUCKER WITH THE HAT at The National Theatre

Stephen Adly Guirgis’s THE MOTHER FUCKER WITH THE HAT at the National Theatre is impressive. Firstly the staging, which is a combination of rotating suspended iconic red New York Fire escapes and smoothly interchanging intimate room scenes is incredible design. 70 more words

Theatre

Review - The Motherfucker with the Hat - National Theater

Although this play did little to attract me at the start – something American with a swear word in the title – I was convinced to make the effort to see it by… 759 more words

The Motherfucker with the Hat - NationalTheatre (Lyttleton)

Stephen Adly Guirgis‘ 2011 play ‘The Motherfucker with the Hat’ is a welcome breath of fresh air in the National’s programme. I was intrigued by the title, the poster and, I’ll admit, the fact that Ricardo Chavira (a face well known to me from endless hours of watching Desperate Housewives) was to star in it; the blurb didn’t give much away and nothing really prepared me to just how incredible the show would be. 529 more words

Reviews

The Motherf**ker With the Hat

Snap crackle & pop. Rice crispy theatre (theater)! This US import, with a British creative team and 40% UK casting, oozes NYC from every pore. The expletive count of the naturalistic dialogue is higher than you’ve probably ever heard, but it’s not gratuitous. 280 more words

Theatre