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Alexander Pope - "The Dunciad: Book the Fourth"Th

In the next excerpt, called “The Educator” by the editors, the Queen Dullness sits on her throne while people throng about her with their petitions. But they all fall silent when the ghost of Dr Busby appears, holding a wand and crowned with birch boughs, “dropping with infant’s blood, and mother’s tears.” Dr Richard Busby was a long-time headmaster of Westminster School, and in this capacity taught – and whipped – a big portion of England’s political and cultural elite (he is said to boast himself that he whipped sixteen future bishops), including Pope’s idol John Dryden. 312 more words

Literature

Alexander Pope - "The Dunciad: Book the Fourth" (excerpts)

The textual history of Pope’s long poem The Dunciad is very complicated and I’ll try to summarize it here succintly. In 1728 Pope publishes his satirical poem… 313 more words

Literature

Alexander Pope - "Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot" (the end)

Pope claims he’s really a gentle soul who never answered back to his critics, even when they slandered him, because he was always a good boy doing whatever his parents taught him: his father believed “it was a sin to call a neighbour fool” and his mother was too innocent to believe that any married woman could be a whore. 263 more words

Literature

Alexander Pope - "Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot" (ctd.)

Pope insists that his poetry was always ethical and curses those who in their writing “give virtue scandal, innocence a fear”. He is always going to criticize the poets who break the ethical code or fake patrons who betray the poets they pretend to support. 224 more words

Literature

Parson's Green, Fulham: seclusion, secrets and novels

Parson’s Green in Fulham still has two green, open spaces in the heart of its residential area. Back in the eighteenth-century, Fulham was a pleasant rural village outside the bustle of London complete with farms and market gardens that supplied the capital with fruit and vegetables, and Parson’s Green was a hamlet within the manor of Fulham where several fine villas were located. 829 more words

An Infamous Mistress

Alexander Pope - "Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot" (ctd.)

Pope says he really doesn’t care about the criticism from bad poets, but he is stung by the unnamed, but easily identifiable, Joseph Addison, who has real talent, but is like Turkish sultans who execute all their brothers when they inherit the throne. 296 more words

Literature

Alexander Pope - "Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot" (ctd.)

Pope describes in comical terms how would-be poets, trying to curry favour with him, compare even his various physical shortcomings to those of some historical celebrities, for instance that he is short like Horace, and when he dies, they will undoubtedly compare him to Homer, who is dead, too. 317 more words

Literature