Tags » Algonquin Round Table

History of Literature #64 - Dorothy Parker

“She was a combination of Little Nell and Lady Macbeth,” said Alexander Woolcott. Dorothy Parker (1893-1967) wrote short stories, poems, reviews, screenplays, and more. Perhaps most famously, she was part of the group of New Yorkers known as the Algonquin Round Table, which met every day for lunch and eventually grew famous for their witticisms, put-downs, and general high spirits.  168 more words


Multi-layered nostalgia


Oy, hockey. What a blow out. Can’t believe I wasted three hours watching the Kings get their asses kicked five zip. Ouch. Not just for the score and humiliation, but for the time utterly wasted. 643 more words

Autobiography,memoirs And Confessions

We Need a Woman Like Dorothy Parker Again

Ever since that morning in high school English class during my sophomore year when I was first exposed to Dorothy Parker, I have been in love with her words. 688 more words


At the Junior Algonquin Club

It’s getting close to Labor Day, time for me to check on the kids to see how they’re doing with their summer reading lists. Things haven’t changed much in our little town since I was a boy; every spring when school gets out a prim, lavender-scented woman at our local library draws up a list of ten categories, and parents agree that each boy and girl who reads a book in all of them by Labor Day gets a reward. 2,330 more words

Dorothy Parker, Born This Day, 1893

“By the time you swear you’re his,
Shivering and sighing.
And he vows his passion is,
Infinite, undying.
Lady make note of this —
One of you is lying.”

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Gobsmacking the reader

Someone, in fact several people, have said that there are only a few basic plots in any story; boy meets girl, the quest, the hero’s journey, revenge, etc. 921 more words


The Detection Club and the Golden Age

The Calendar:
I will be exhibiting along with Millie Mack, author of the Faraday mysteries, at the Kensington, Maryland, Day of the Book on April 24. 466 more words

On Writing