Tags » Ambrose Burnside

A Total Disaster: The Battle of the Crater, July 30, 1864

The American Civil War, in my opinion, is a huge turning point in our history. Our less than 100-year-old nation split in two and took up arms against each other, pitting the industrial North and the agrarian, slave-holding South. 1,762 more words

Ambrose Burnside

The Mine, Again (March 13, 1865)

Back in Philadelphia, Margaretta Meade is stiff grieving over the death of her eldest son, John Sergeant, the previous month. The general suggests she come and visit the army. 2,996 more words

Quite a Sensation in the Army (March 4, 1865)

The affair of the “Mine” continues to reverberate, as both George Meade and Theodore Lyman comment on an account of the action, also known as the Battle of the Crater, that appeared in the Washington Chronicle. 587 more words

Report on the Mine (February 9, 1865)

General Meade writes home about the report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War’s on the Battle of the Crater (a.k.a. the Mine). 782 more words

'He Was Never Seen or Heard From After': Dealing with Disappearance at the Battle of the Crater

In July 1865 the State Census came to the town of Westfield, Massachusetts. One of the community recorded there was Abby Sullivan, who was described as a 42 year-old Irish woman. 1,686 more words

Irish American Civil War

Fleeting Fame: Union Colonel John Fitzroy De Courcy

It is not unusual for the commander of a defeated force to get sacked. Nor is it unusual for such a commander to suffer additional consequences, if that defeat is particularly egregious, or seems to involve an overly ripe degree of blundering. 1,465 more words

Battlefields & Historic Places

152 Years Ago--Burnside's Second Offensive Becomes the "Mud March"

As the calendar flipped to 1863, perhaps the darkest cloud of the war had descended upon the northern populace. On December 29, 1862, William T. Sherman’s attempts to take Vicksburg, Mississippi fizzled in front of the Confederate defenses. 527 more words