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The next steps: When college admissions don't go as planned

When Alyson Merlin, who grew up outside of Atlanta, was applying to college, she had a clear picture of what she wanted from her four years — and it mainly involved leaving the South. 665 more words

VOICES FROM CAMPUS

post-punk gems, v. 63 -- The Clash (on Toots)

Happy Wednesday, folks. It’s a terrifically sunny day here in western Massachusetts, and I’m excited about this afternoon’s talk at Amherst College — 430pm, Cooper House. 60 more words

Popular Music History

AC Voice Appreciates: Valentine Victories


(Katherine Stanton)– The most exciting piece of news I heard immediately after returning from spring break was that Val had rolled out a new sandwich line. 587 more words

Amherst College

Will Farrell wants to ban all fraternities: Is he on to something?

Since several brothers of the University of Oklahoma Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) chapter were caught chanting racist slurs earlier this month, many have spoken out against the antiquated practices of Greek life, including comedian Will Ferrell. 92 more words

Christian Science Monitor

Sculpture Finalist: Sachiko Akiyama

Before Spring Break, the last of the three finalists for the sculpture faculty search came to visit UNH. Sachiko Akiyama finished her Undergraduate degree at Amherst College in Massachusetts, then went on to receive her MFA in Sculpture at Boston University in 2005. 452 more words

Art Department Lectures

Alex Bernstein- North Social / InOak

Alex Bernstein is a former offensive lineman in the NFL, who played for the Baltimore Ravens, New York Jets, Cleveland Browns, and Atlanta Falcons between 1997 to 2000. 197 more words

Lifestyle

Antonio Benítez-Rojo (1931-2005)

Antonio Benítez-Rojo was Thomas B. Walton, Jr. Professor of Spanish at Amherst College since 1983. He died January 5, 2005, Northampton, Massachusetts. Although our blog renders tribute daily to this influential pan-Caribbeanist, today, we remember the leading scholar and author on his birthday, March 14 (1931). 754 more words

Literature