Tags » Andromeda Galaxy

andromeda galaxy

Die Andromeda-Galaxie (M31) mit ihren Begleitern M32 und M110, aufgenommen am 06.02.2016. Belichtung 25x90s, Teleobjektiv 200mm f/8, ISO2000, 4 Dark-Frames, 3 Flat-Frames. Bildverarbeitung mit DeepSkyStacker und Photoshop mit AstronomyTools. 53 more words

Astrofoto

Andromeda

Amazing photo of Andromeda Galaxy. Courtesy from Leonard Vilnius, Time Traveler.

Leonard Vilnius

A ride on a Cable Car

In about 4 billion years between the two largest galaxies in the Local Group —the Milky Way (which contains the Solar System and Earth) and the Andromeda Galaxy— will occur an astonishing cataclism. 33 more words

Leonard Vilnius

Globular Clusters

This is Hubble’s rendition of a smashed rock in someone’s driveway.  LOL!  It kind of looks like that…  Globular clusters are large aggregations of stars, that are gravitation-ally bound, not ‘Big gobs of spit!’  Our galaxy contains about 150 globular clusters.  413 more words

Astronomy

NuStar’s latest image maps Andromeda’s dead stars

NuSTAR has observed 40 “X-ray binaries” — intense sources of X-rays comprised of a black hole or neutron star that feeds off a stellar companion. 532 more words

Astronomy

X-ray Sources in Andromeda

The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (or NuSTAR) has captured the best high-energy X-ray view yet of a band across Andromeda, our nearest large, neighboring galaxy. The satellite has observed 40 “X-ray binaries,” intense sources of X-rays comprised of a black hole or neutron star that feeds off a stellar companion.

Image Credit: NASA

Science

Andromeda galaxy scanned with high-energy X-ray vision

NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, has captured the best high-energy X-ray view yet of a portion of our nearest large, neighboring galaxy, Andromeda. The space mission has observed 40 “X-ray binaries”—intense sources of X-rays comprised of a black hole or neutron star that feeds off a stellar companion.

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Articles