Tags » Anglo-Norman

A Matter Of Tongues

Language fascinates me—as anyone who’s been following crimsonprose for more than a couple of months can testify. I’m also attracted to mysteries and unsolved puzzles. 2,110 more words

advantage

A benefit that puts someone ahead. Anglo-Norman “avauntage”=benefit, superiority < Latin “abante < “ab-“=from + “ante”=before.

Etymology

moil

To wet, soak, or moisten; to turn into a soft mass. Anglo-Norman “moiller” < Latin “molliare”=to moisten < “mollis”=soft.

Etymology

proditor

A traitor; a betrayer. Anglo-Norman “proditour” < Latin “proditor” < “prodere”=to betray < “pro-“=away from + “dare”=to give.

Etymology

terrible

Causing fear and/or terror; extremely bad. Anglo-Norman “terrible” < Latin “terrere”=to frighten < Sanskrit “tras-“=tremble.

Etymology

Malcolm's English origins in twelfth-century Anglo-Norman chronicles

One of the greatest difficulties in researching King Malcolm is the nature and content of the sources themselves. Though there are some sources that are contemporary to Malcolm’s reign, such as the… 991 more words

Chronicles

advertise/advertize

Promote a product. Anglo-Norman “advertir”=draw attention to < Latin “advertere” “ad-“= toward + “vertere”=turn toward

Etymology