Tags » Anglo-Norman

Clash of Knights! Scarborough Castle

Scarborough Castle in North Yorkshire is managed by English Heritage, and occupies a superb position on a promontory between two bays (North and South Bays) overlooking the harbour and Old Town in Scarborough. 454 more words

UK

988 – The Norse King Glúniairn recognises Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, High King of Ireland, and agrees to pay taxes and accept Brehon Law; the event is considered to be the founding of the city of Dublin.

The earliest reference to Dublin is sometimes said to be found in the writings of Claudius Ptolemaeus (Ptolemy), the Egyptian-Greek astronomer and cartographer, around the year 140, who refers to a settlement called Eblana. 25 more words

Irish Blog

988 – The Norse King Glúniairn recognises Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, High King of Ireland, and agrees to pay taxes and accept Brehon Law; the event is considered to be the founding of the city of Dublin.

The earliest reference to Dublin is sometimes said to be found in the writings of Claudius Ptolemaeus (Ptolemy), the Egyptian-Greek astronomer and cartographer, around the year 140, who refers to a settlement called Eblana. 489 more words

Irish History

Book Review - The Angevin Empire

Book Review, Duncan Mac na Ceardadh

The Angevin Empire

John Gillingham

Arnold Publishers, 2001

This book had been on my search list for many years, so when I finally obtained a copy, I devoured it rather swiftly – a task not too difficult, as the book is intended as an introductory text to the topic. 275 more words

Book Review

menace

To threaten; to be a danger to. Anglo-Norman “manacer” < Latin “minac-, minax”=threat.

Etymology

affray

A fight, argument, or disturbance in a public place. Anglo-Norman “afrayer”=disturb, startle < Latin “affraium”=brawl, disturbance.

Etymology