Tags » Anglo-Norman

vigil

A period of time when you stay awake in order to pray or watch for danger. Anglo-Norman “vigile” < Latin “vigilia”=watch < “vigil”=awake, alert.

Etymology

sexton

A person who takes care of a church building and the area around it. Anglo-Norman “segrestein” < Latin “sacristanus” < “sacris”=sacred + “-ista”=noun-suffix indicating a person.

Etymology

reprove

To criticize someone for something that they have done. Anglo-Norman “reprover”=to criticize < Latin “reprobare”=to reject, condemn.

Etymology

rent

A regular payment for use of a room or dwelling that belongs to someone else. Anglo-Norman “rent”=payment < Latin “rendere”=to recite or repeat.

Etymology

How and When the 32 Counties of Ireland Formed

The division of Ireland into shires or counties is of Anglo-Norman and English origin. The counties generally represent the older native territories and sub-kingdoms.

King John formed twelve counties in 1210. 268 more words

Irish History

scallion

A type of young onion with a small round end and a long green stem. Anglo-Norman “scaloun” < based on Latin “Ascalonia caepa”= onion from Ascalon, a port in Palestine.

Etymology

affable

Friendly, good-natured, and easy to talk to. Anglo-Norman “affable” < Latin “affari”=to speak to < “af-“=toward + “fari”=to speak.

Etymology