Tags » Anthony Burgess

Review of Antoinette Tijani Alou’s “On m’appelle Nina”

On m’appelle Nina, by Antoinette Tijani Alou, was published in March 2017 by Présence africaine. This novel centers on the story of Vilhelminma, a woman who leaves her home island—Jamaica—to settle down in Niger for love. 291 more words

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REVIEW OF ANTOINETTE TIJANI ALOU’S “ON M’APPELLE NINA”

  On m’appelle Nina, by Antoinette Tijani Alou, was published in March 2017 by Présence africaine. This novel centers on the story of Vilhelminma, a woman who leaves her home island—Jamaica—to settle down in Niger for love. In his review of the novel, Jean-Marie Teno refers to it as a work of autofiction. Here are translated excerpts of his review in Africultures.  He writes: This powerful text with a circular structure—the last sentence is the dedication of the novel, the starting point, as in many African heritage stories—left me feeling dumbfounded and dazed, but also light, with a desire to start the journey over again, to relish in the pleasure of language, which the author makes musical, even when she describes moments that are extremely difficult to bear. I want to reread it over and over so as not to let the shocking nature of the subject take away from the beauty of the text and the depth of some of its reflections. With Antoinette and Nina, we cross oceans, we revisit the journey of their lives. In some instances, we are passionate witnesses; in others, we are presented with the critical distance that inserts their narrative in a philosophical quest, in which one may draw material for personal and spiritual enrichment. After a dormancy that drags us into the storyline, where we sometimes wonder which parts are true and which are fiction, the plot gradually positions us in a larger questioning, in which the intimate, the personal, and questions of identity come together to offer us a reflection on humanity, Africanness, femininity, and the difficulty to survive our loved ones, especially children. Constructed as a play or a script in three acts, “Dormance” and “Une saison de si” frame “L’enfant bleu,” the heart of the matter—a slice of life that they bring into perspective. [. . .] For full review (in French), see http://africultures.com/on-mappelle-nina-de-antoinette-tijani-alou/ Also see http://www.presenceafricaine.com/romans-litterature-africaine-caraibes/986-on-m-appelle-nina-9782708708983.html

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

I have to admit that I was a little concerned when my book group chose A Clockwork Orange as May’s read – it’s a book that I’ve tried to read several times before, but have never finished.  693 more words

Book Reviews

Tat Me Up!

There are some things in this world that last forever – books and tattoos are just two of those things. Some books stay with us right from the first word, until long after we’ve turned the final page.   161 more words

Books

30 Day Book Challenge - Day Seventeen

We’re delving more into the favourite category with day seventeen of the challenge, and today is a topic that I’ve been looking forward to because it was pretty easy for me to narrow it down. 370 more words

30 Day Book Challenge

A Clockwork Orange

This zonk was ringliddy foodla and I couldn’t stop nopping the doodlewotsit.

A great idea written in gibberish is still gibberish. The real shame is, when you wade through the drivel (or ‘Nadsat’), there’s actually a very interesting concept. 371 more words

2 Star

Jonathan Meades - the Plagiarist in the Kitchen

The tributes to AA Gill who died earlier this year tended to focus on his humour, his famous rudeness, and his ability to write movingly about those on the margins of life. 852 more words

Film And TV

Books I Probably Should Have Read...

As a voracious reader, I have always been aware that there are several (hundred) tomes which I should have read already, but haven’t.  I’m almost entirely sure that most readers have the same problem.  1,047 more words