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Rats in a cage

Question: is it better for a human to choose to be bad than be conditioned to be good?

The American psychologist B. F. Skinner believed that human behaviour was determined by environmental variables rather than free will, and that by systematically altering those variables human behaviour could be modified. 2,279 more words

Books

Literature as Music

Jonathan L. Friedmann, Ph.D.

Aspects of music can be spatially represented through notation and recording, which freeze moments in time. But, as an experiential medium, which relies on performance and audition, music reveals itself in the present tense. 408 more words

Music

Sympathy for the Devil - A Clockwork Orange Character Analysis

Alex DeLarge from A Clockwork Orange is one of the most amoral characters ever put to page or screen. It’s no exaggeration to say he’s a representation of the Devil, an incarnation of primal evil. 1,601 more words

Film

#MODERNCLASSICS - A CLOCKWORK ORANGE by Anthony Burgess @anthonyburgess (February 24th 2000 by @PenguinUKBooks)

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE by Anthony Burgess, February 24th 2000 by Penguin Classics (first published December 1962)

Told by the central character, Alex, this brilliant, hilarious, and disturbing novel creates an alarming futuristic vision of violence, high technology, and authoritarianism. 322 more words

Review

Review of Antoinette Tijani Alou’s “On m’appelle Nina”

On m’appelle Nina, by Antoinette Tijani Alou, was published in March 2017 by Présence africaine. This novel centers on the story of Vilhelminma, a woman who leaves her home island—Jamaica—to settle down in Niger for love. 291 more words

News

Mr. Militant Negro reblogged this on The Militant Negro™ and commented:

REVIEW OF ANTOINETTE TIJANI ALOU’S “ON M’APPELLE NINA”

  On m’appelle Nina, by Antoinette Tijani Alou, was published in March 2017 by Présence africaine. This novel centers on the story of Vilhelminma, a woman who leaves her home island—Jamaica—to settle down in Niger for love. In his review of the novel, Jean-Marie Teno refers to it as a work of autofiction. Here are translated excerpts of his review in Africultures.  He writes: This powerful text with a circular structure—the last sentence is the dedication of the novel, the starting point, as in many African heritage stories—left me feeling dumbfounded and dazed, but also light, with a desire to start the journey over again, to relish in the pleasure of language, which the author makes musical, even when she describes moments that are extremely difficult to bear. I want to reread it over and over so as not to let the shocking nature of the subject take away from the beauty of the text and the depth of some of its reflections. With Antoinette and Nina, we cross oceans, we revisit the journey of their lives. In some instances, we are passionate witnesses; in others, we are presented with the critical distance that inserts their narrative in a philosophical quest, in which one may draw material for personal and spiritual enrichment. After a dormancy that drags us into the storyline, where we sometimes wonder which parts are true and which are fiction, the plot gradually positions us in a larger questioning, in which the intimate, the personal, and questions of identity come together to offer us a reflection on humanity, Africanness, femininity, and the difficulty to survive our loved ones, especially children. Constructed as a play or a script in three acts, “Dormance” and “Une saison de si” frame “L’enfant bleu,” the heart of the matter—a slice of life that they bring into perspective. [. . .] For full review (in French), see http://africultures.com/on-mappelle-nina-de-antoinette-tijani-alou/ Also see http://www.presenceafricaine.com/romans-litterature-africaine-caraibes/986-on-m-appelle-nina-9782708708983.html

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

I have to admit that I was a little concerned when my book group chose A Clockwork Orange as May’s read – it’s a book that I’ve tried to read several times before, but have never finished.  693 more words

Book Reviews