Tags » Aphra Behn

Literary Criticism of Aphra Behn

Aphra Behn (1640–1689) was a pioneer in many respects. Because of her family circumstances and her husband’s early death, she was obliged to support herself as a writer – the first woman to do so. 1,502 more words

Literary Theory

Aphra Behn: A Secret Life, by Janet Todd

Vile Punk Poetess, Playwright, and Spy

Aphra Behn, born around the year 1640, and probably, according to Todd’s research, somewhere between 1637 and 1643, was a woman of ‘firsts’, surprises, and renown. 579 more words

Non-Fiction

Wonderful Women: Inspiring Firsts

With the recent announcement that the women of Saudi Arabia will be given the right to drive, it got us thinking about other amazing firsts for women. 360 more words

Ed

Aphra Behn - "Oroonoko" (the end)

Oroonoko recovers enough to tell his story, but he hopes he is going to die and promises that if his friends don’t kill him off, he is going to be dangerous to many. 292 more words

Literature

Aphra Behn - "Oroonoko" (ctd.)

After they say their goodbye, Imoinda lies herself on the ground and Caesar cuts her throat and then cuts off her still smiling head. Then he covers her body with flowers, sits down and stares at her for two days. 199 more words

Literature

Aphra Behn - "Oroonoko" (ctd.)

The narrator says that when the news broke out that the slaves had left, the white inhabitants of Parham were sure that Caesar would come back at night and cut their throats, and for that reason she and other women left and went down the river for their security; otherwise they would have never allowed Caesar to be so brutally treated. 421 more words

Literature

Aphra Behn - "Oroonoko" (ctd.)

The English find it easy to pursue the slaves because they have to burn their way through the jungle, so they are easy to spot. Caesar sends all the women and children to the back, and the men start to fight, but they are disorganized. 307 more words

Literature