Tags » Appalachian History

Daddy

Daddy

Daddy seems to be the preferred call sign of a southern father. You don’t hear Alabama ‘youngins’ calling their father, dad or father.  The general characteristics of our Daddy depended upon which generation he belonged. 1,164 more words

Family

Unpacking and Unpacking ASA

It’s been a while since my last post but not without reasons For starters, another wrestling season in the the books. The team had a pretty good run this year and I couldn’t be prouder. 124 more words

Appalachian History

“What do y’all want to be called?”

by Ann Miller Woodford

Ann Miller Woodford is our guest contributor to this Shelf Life in the Mountains. She is a native of Andrews, NC, and is an…

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Books

Foundations of Appalachia

A couple weekends ago my grandfather and I went hiking along some unmarked trails that his neighbor in Greenbriar had mentioned to him. Apparently my Grandfathers neighbor was told by his father about an old community where there used to be a high school, but it had since been forgotten after the residents were forced to move out when the National Park was established. 232 more words

Travel

40th Annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference

The count down has begun. In almost two months I will be presenting at the 40th Annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference. This is one of my favorite academic conferences so needless to say, I am excited to be able to attend and present. 151 more words

U.S. History

"O Lord, Where Will I Put It?": A Ghost Tale by Mrs. Wesley Metcalf of Del Rio, Tennessee

The Archives has several ghost tales available for research, many of which can be found in the Joseph Sargent Hall Collection. Beginning in the 1930s, Hall recorded stories, remedies, and songs from individuals who still lived in or were displaced by the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. 81 more words

From Our Collection

Ada's Sauerkraut

When my Great Uncle Carroll died, the task of cleaning out his home was left to my parents. It was a little white house next to a church, nestled in a valley in a dying town overshadowed by a paper mill. 572 more words

Appalachia