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Landscape of an Artist's Being

Were they streams of thoughts or a series of dreamscapes?

Today I visited an exhibition of artist/poet Johanna Ng’s work at Kinokuniya bookstore’s Wedge Gallery.  Like rushing streams, like craggy mountains, like floating lilies, and like so many familiar motifs impossible to catch and pin down,  these are an artist’s subconscious brush strokes that express what we Chinese say,  只可意會,不可言傳,things that can only be perceived but cannot be conveyed in so many words. 26 more words

Casper Kang, "Jade Pool Mirror / The Nonplussed State of Things"

An offering displayed on a log—empty offering plates, set up with care, as counting for all the ancestors, yet with nothing to offer; an offering for a family without descendants, an extinguished genealogy. 758 more words

Visual Art

Art Review: The Boulevard Montmartre at Night

A Peaceful Parisian Night

Camille Pissarro, The Boulevard Montmartre at Night, 1897

Often, a bird’s eye view is the best way to see a city. 740 more words

To Go Kupps

Tenderness and Temperature

Tenderness and Temperature

By Caroline Bachmann and Stefan Banz

Edition KMD

Verlag für moderne Kunst, 2011

ISBN: 9783869842417

Take up this book and inside you will see photos of various cemeteries in and around Berlin, most being Christian, of course, but with the odd Jewish and Islamic cemetery thrown in as well. 434 more words

Book Review

Stefano Cagol's Body of Energy

STEFANO CAGOL IS THE ARTIST IN THE HOT SEAT…


Stefano Cagol makes a personal revolution universal in his Berlin “Readymade,” the subject of “HOT SEAT” looping behind him in his exhibition at CLB Berlin. 743 more words

ART REVIEW

Mourning and Fecundity

Vincent Desiderio

at Marlborough Gallery

Vincent Desiderio is perhaps settling too comfortably into the role of master.  Long considered one of the more skilled and thoughtful painters of our generation, his impressive 2011 showing at New York’s Marlborough put him amongst our best.  1,124 more words

Paradise Lost

Raqib Shaw

at Pace Gallery

London-based artist Raqib Shaw’s new exhibition, Paradise Lost, is an ostensibly spectacular show, with firm emphasis on the spectacle.  Sumptuous, excessive, manically expressive, allusions to Milton drift readily to McCarthy, whose Blood Meridian seems an apt linkage to Shaw’s hammering work.  916 more words