Tags » Australian Cinema

'Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome' (1985): Review

Directed by: George Miller, George Ogilvie || Produced by: George Miller

Screenplay by: Terry Hayes, George Miller || Starring: Mel Gibson, Tina Turner, Bruce Spence, Adam Cockburn, Frank Thring, Angelo Rossitto, Paul Larsson, Angry Anderson, Robert Grubb, Helen Buday, Edwin Hodgeman… 854 more words

-[Film Reviews]-

DAMIEN LIPP ON THE WORLD PREMIERE OF ONE-SHOT WONDER 'WATCH THE SUNSET'

‘Watch The Sunset’ Producer and Director of Photography Damien Lipp on what it takes to capture a film in one-shot

https://todaytoknights.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/interview-damien-lipp-watch-the-sunset.mp3

“Watch The Sunset is Australia’s first one-take feature film… it’s basically shot over an afternoon. 74 more words

Film

Don's Party (Australia 1976)

Don’s Party is another example of the 1970s ‘New Australian Cinema’ or an ‘AFC’ film as Australian film studies now terms such films, referring to public funding via the Australian Film Commission and similar state funding schemes. 1,090 more words

Comedies

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

Director: George Miller. Starring: Mel Gibson, Bruce Spence, Vernon Wells. Australia, 1981. Budget: $2 million. IMDb: 7.6. My rating: 2/4. Post-apocalyptic gory gasoline obsessed car chasing sci-fi. 668 more words

Sci-fi

Berlin Syndrome (Australia-Germany 2017)

The title Berlin Syndrome is very suggestive in this feature about a young female tourist who finds herself trapped after a casual sexual encounter in Berlin. 921 more words

Films By Women

Review - We Don't Need a Map (2017)

Director: Warwick Thornton

Starring: Warwick Thornton

In 2010, riding high on the success of his debut feature Samson & Delilah, Aboriginal filmmaker Warwick Thornton found himself in hot water when he suggested that the Southern Cross was fast becoming Australia’s equivalent to the swastika. 589 more words

Reviews

WE DON'T NEED A MAP

We Don’t Need A Map chronicles Thornton’s exploration, amongst other reflections on Australian society, on that most fairly contentious of symbols the Southern Cross.

Himself a subject of controversy for previously positing the perspective, which he re-visits at length in the film, that the Southern Cross is starting to be seen “as a very racist nationalistic emblem,” Thornton’s views are as much on display here as those of his interviewees, with a secondary camera-man steadily documenting Thornton’s reactions to each of a varied set of personalities, many largely of a view akin to the filmmaker’s. 238 more words

Reviews